Dec 072019
 
 December 7, 2019  Posted by at 10:26 am Finance Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , ,


Dorothea Lange Homeless mother and child walking from Phoenix to Imperial County CA Feb 1939

 

Donald Trump and Jerome Powell Can ‘Take Another Victory Lap’ (Y!)
Abenomics has Failed Japan. Financial Times Wants to Make it Global. (Lacalle)
What the ‘Expert’ Panel Should Have Told You About Impeachment (ET)
A Fraught Moment (Kunstler)
Strzok and Page Did Real Damage (Cortese)
Pelosi Puts A Brave Face On A Doomed Mission (Tucker Carlson)
Bloomberg On His Democratic Rivals: ‘Trump Would Eat ‘Em Up’ (R.)
Kamala Harris, Michael Bloomberg, and a Supreme Court Decision (IC)
Musk’s Defamation Win May Reset Legal Landscape For Social Media (R.)
Saudi Arabia Retreats From The Troubles Its Clown Prince Caused (MoA)

 

 

If you look only at jobs, and not even the quality of those jobs, things may appear shiny. We get it.

Donald Trump and Jerome Powell Can ‘Take Another Victory Lap’ (Y!)

The November jobs report crushed expectations on Friday, sending the stock market surging. “Jerome Powell and Donald Trump can take another victory lap,” said Danielle DiMartino Booth, a former Federal Reserve advisor and CEO of Quill Intelligence. The economy added 266,000 jobs in November, according to a report released Friday by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The prior two months of job gains were revised higher pushing the three month average of job adds to 205,000. “In stark contrast to just about every other source of economic data, the jobs data insists the U.S. economy is strong, and that is all markets care about as it is the most visible and most quoted,” Booth said. “The reaction in the dollar and bond yields speaks volumes to how surprised markets were to this data.”


[..] As for Fed Chair Jerome Powell, he has steered a Federal Reserve that cut interest rates three times so far this year in an effort to reverse the hawkishness of Fed policy last year, which included four rate hikes, and to get ahead of any economic weakness sparked by the ongoing trade tensions between the U.S. and China. The Federal Reserve meets again next week, and most market participants aren’t expecting any changes to rates. “Despite the strengthening trend, this [jobs report] will not change anything at the Fed aside from what officials say publicly,” Booth said.

Read more …

Abe and the BOJ looked only at deflation. And the harder they tried to make them spend, the more fearful of spending the Japanse people became.

Abenomics has Failed Japan. Financial Times Wants to Make it Global. (Lacalle)

A recent article in the Financial Times, “Abenomics provides a lesson for the rich world,” mentioned that the experiment started by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in the early 2010s should serve as an important warning for rich countries. Unfortunately, the article’s “lessons” were rather disappointing. These were mainly that the central bank can do a lot more than the ECB and the Fed are doing, and that Japan is not doing so badly. I disagree. The failure of Abenomics has been phenomenal. The balance sheet of the Central Bank of Japan has ballooned to more than 100% of the country’s GDP, the central bank owns almost 70% of the country’s ETFs and is one of the top 10 shareholders in the majority of the largest companies of the Nikkei index.

Government debt to GDP has swelled to 236%, and despite the record-low cost of debt, the government spends almost 22% of the budget on interest expenses. All of this to achieve what? None of the results that were expected from the massive monetary experiment, inventively called QQE (quantitative and qualitative easing) have been achieved, even remotely. Growth is expected to be one of the weakest in the world in 2020, according to the IMF, and the country has consistently missed both its inflation and economic growth targets, while the balance sheet of the central banks and the country’s debt soared. Real wages have been stagnant for years, and economic activity continues to be as poor as it was in the previous two decades of constant stimulus.

[..] The wrong diagnosis will lead to worsening outcomes. When the government is surrounded by economists that tell them that the problem of the economy is that there are too many savings, the government will decide to raise taxes and create a larger problem attacking consumption. With private debt at 221% of GDP. Japan has many issues, none of them being a “savings glut.” If you abandon structural reforms, the results will be worse. The QQE program was based on three “arrows”: monetary policy, government spending, and structural reforms. Guess which arrow they forgot to implement? Exactly. Structural reforms never happened, and when they did, they came in the form of higher taxes and more interventionism, the opposite of what the economy needed.

Read more …

Back to the 18th century we go.

What the ‘Expert’ Panel Should Have Told You About Impeachment (ET)

Many phrases in the Constitution—such as “necessary and proper,” “Privileges and Immunities,” and “Convention for proposing Amendments”—carry specialized 18th century meanings not obvious to the modern reader. Recall that most of the leading Founders were lawyers and the Constitution is a legal document. Some of these phrases derive from 18th century law. Therefore, to understand them you have to consult 18th century legal materials in addition to better-known sources such as the 1787 convention debates or the Federalist Papers. Unfortunately, most of the scholars called by the House Judiciary Committee to address the meaning of “high Crimes and Misdemeanors” were not able to do so accurately.

According to the authoritative Westlaw database, two of the three Democratically appointed witnesses have published no scholarly work on impeachment: Their specialties are in other areas. None showed any familiarity with 18th century fiduciary standards—which (as explained below) are part of the law of impeachment. All of the witnesses voted against President Trump, and several have been involved in anti-Trump activity. It’s not surprising, therefore, that, except for professor Jonathan Turley’s heavily footnoted 53-page written statement, the testimony was biased and superficial. [..] The core of the case against President Trump is that he used his political position to seek re-election assistance from a foreign government. Although there’s dark talk of crimes committed, the principal charge is fiduciary rather than criminal. In other words, a “high … Misdemeanor.”

House Democrats have struggled to define Trump’s alleged offense. Initially, they described it as “quid pro quo.” Then they employed the term “bribery.” The legally correct designation is “self-dealing.” Self-dealing is betraying your employer’s interests to enrich yourself. It’s a violation of the fiduciary duty of loyalty. We can assume the president might benefit from a Ukrainian investigation, but that doesn’t mean asking for an investigation was self-dealing as defined by fiduciary, and therefore by impeachment, law. There’s nothing unusual or improper about a president asking a recipient of U.S. foreign aid to address corruption. As for seeking political advantage: If we punished every politician who did that, they would all be swinging from the yardarm.

This is as true in foreign as in domestic affairs. When President Barack Obama told the Russian president he would have more flexibility after his re-election, he was saying (1) an agreement now would benefit both Russia and the United States, but (2) I’m going to sacrifice our mutual interests for the present because such an agreement might hurt my re-election campaign. Was this impeachable self-dealing? Almost certainly not. So where is the divide between “normal” conduct and impeachable conduct? To answer this, we need to weigh at least three factors: impeachment precedent, the national interest, and the practice of other presidents.

Read more …

The Horowitz report is due on Monday. He’s scheduled to testify on Wednesday.

A Fraught Moment (Kunstler)

The IG has no real law enforcement powers. He can only refer or recommend further action. Nevertheless, a great miasma of anxiety oppresses the Democratic Party now as it awaits whatever Mr. Horowitz has to say about these matters. The party’s propaganda arms at The New York Times, the WashPo, and cable news networks worked up a frenzy of distractions and ruses this past week — for instance the “bombshell” that International-Man-of-Mystery Joseph Mifsud was not a hireling of the FBI. Of course, nobody ever claimed he was. Rather, he is suspected of being an agent of the Italian intel service with links to British intel, both used by the CIA as beards for its nefarious activities around its own election meddling of 2016.


House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s Democratic caucus has been busy with ersatz impeachment proceedings, which are invidiously scheduled to continue next week as a smokescreen to conceal the Horowitz findings. It’s been a frantic campaign for them at a fraught moment in this long saga — but the odor of desperation is thick and rank. Of course, behind the Horowitz report loom the specters of Barr & Durham. Whatever they’ve been up to has been hermetically sealed in a globe of silence even more oppressive and nightmarish for the Dems than the IG’s inquiry. Barr & Durham are able to make things stick, most crucially genuine criminal culpability for the entire RussiaGate fiasco and all of its offshoots, including the most recent “Whistleblower” caper — a patently treasonous scheme. Who knows if and when indictments start raining down, but there’s a chance that it will be a very hard rain indeed.

Read more …

Jeff Cortese, a financial crimes manager in the private sector, is the former acting chief of the FBI’s Public Corruption Unit.

Strzok and Page Did Real Damage (Cortese)

Strzok and Page were employed by what was the world’s leading law enforcement agency. The integrity of their work and the work of their FBI peers was paramount to maintaining stability and confidence in the country and its law enforcement. It’s not news that the FBI’s reputation has taken a hit in recent years, but the extent of the impact from the imprudence of Strzok and Page is likely not fully understood by most people. Their obvious improprieties created a level of widespread distrust in the FBI not previously seen. Recruiting assets and sources, finding willing participants for interviews, and even trial success can all be adversely impacted by the decline in the FBI’s reputation.

Former colleagues have told me they recently lost otherwise strong cases because lone jurors claimed after trial they refused to convict anyone investigated by the FBI. Criminals are literally walking the streets because the FBI has lost the confidence of the American people. And that decline is directly linked to the famously poor judgment made by two senior FBI employees who knew better. This is precisely why the FBI teaches its agents never to engage in activity on FBI phones or in a public forum that reveals personal bias. The risk to the Agency is too significant. The work of all the great men and women in the FBI should not be jeopardized by the actions of one, or two, of its people.

As Americans we have a soft spot for stories of redemption. We are a country of second chances, and that is a good thing. The idea that anyone could find pleasure in someone’s downfall is abhorrent, even if they hold opposing political views. That is not to say Peter Strzok and Lisa Page did not do this to themselves. They did. They made themselves political talking points that will be used by politicians and pundits until the next election, and perhaps beyond.

Read more …

“The framers, Pelosi tells us, worried that corrupt Americans might take money from foreign powers to do their bidding. And that, class, is why we need to impeach Donald Trump. Get it? Wait a second. Trump didn’t take money from Ukraine; Hunter Biden did.”

Pelosi Puts A Brave Face On A Doomed Mission (Tucker Carlson)

Nancy Pelosi, Speaker of the House: “Let us begin where our Founders began in 1776: “When in the course of human events it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bonds which have connected them with another.” With those words, our founders courageously began our Declaration of Independence, from an oppressive monarch, for among other grievances, the king’s refusal to follow rightfully passed laws. In the course of today’s events, it becomes necessary for us to address, among other grievances, the president’s failure to faithfully execute the law.” It’s just mesmerizing on many levels. But what did it mean exactly? Well, it was a metaphor. Trump is a slightly more orange version of King George III.

Democrats are the patriots plotting to overthrow him with violence. If that strikes you as alarming, Pelosi has a few words of comfort. A group of 18th-century slaveholders, she assures us, would have been completely in favor of what she’s doing. Pelosi: “James Madison, the architect of the Constitution, warned that the president might betray his trust to foreign powers, which might prove fatal to the republic. Another Founder, Gouverneur Morris, feared that a president may be bribed by a greater interest to betray his trust. He emphasized that this magistrate is not the king. The people are the king.” So, James Madison has given Nancy Pelosi his personal seal of approval. Remember that the next time Pelosi’s acolytes try to pull Madison’s statue off its pedestal for crimes against progressive orthodoxy.

For a brief moment, the Founders of our country are useful to the left, so they’re being presented as heroes. Enjoy it while it lasts. The framers, Pelosi tells us, worried that corrupt Americans might take money from foreign powers to do their bidding. And that, class, is why we need to impeach Donald Trump.Get it? Wait a second. Trump didn’t take money from Ukraine; Hunter Biden did. Trump just pointed that out. He was on James Madison side on that score, vigilantly policing bribery by a hostile foreign power. And for that, he must be removed from office.

Read more …

But not him?

Bloomberg On His Democratic Rivals: ‘Trump Would Eat ‘Em Up’ (R.)

Democratic presidential contender Michael Bloomberg said on Friday that Donald Trump would easily defeat any of his Democratic White House rivals in next year’s election, bluntly declaring: “Donald Trump would eat ‘em up.” Bloomberg, 77, a billionaire media mogul and former New York mayor, was a late entry into the race last month. He has been privately disparaging of his Democratic presidential rivals but this was the first time he had been so critical of them in public. In an interview on CBS’s “This Morning,” Bloomberg said: “I looked at our national government getting worse, the way we’re behaving overseas and domestically, led by our president.”


“I said back in 2016, ‘He is the wrong person for the job. He doesn’t have the temperament or the ethics or the intellect to do the job.’” Bloomberg added: “And I said, ‘We just can’t have another four years of this.’ And then I watched all the candidates. And I just thought to myself: ‘Donald Trump would eat ‘em up’.” Bloomberg, a former Republican and independent, fears that liberal candidates such as U.S. Senators Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders, and their proposed costly expansion of government programs, will alienate voters in battleground states.

Read more …

I wouldn’t want to create the impression that Kamala due to a lack of money.

Kamala Harris, Michael Bloomberg, and a Supreme Court Decision (IC)

Democratic Sen. Kamala Harris of California suspended her presidential campaign on Tuesday. Why? Because, she said, she did not “have the financial resources we need to continue. I’m not a billionaire. I can’t fund my own campaign.” Meanwhile, former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who definitely is a billionaire, has spent at least $57 million of his own money since he jumped into the race on November 24. Harris, by contrast, raised $36 million as of her last campaign filing in October. Of that, she’d spent almost $26 million since she announced her campaign last January 21. The divergence in the fates of the two candidates can be traced back to a Supreme Court decision on the constitutionality of campaign finance law.

But the case involved is not Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, from 2010. It’s a far less famous one: Buckley v. Valeo, from 1976. The decision opened the door for billionaires — and, more generally, the ultra-rich — to spend as much as they want on their own political campaigns. The divergence in the fates of Harris and Bloomberg can be traced back to a Supreme Court decision — not from Citizens United in 2010, but Buckley v. Valeo in 1976. One of the main forces behind the case was a young Republican lawyer named John Bolton, later to become President Donald Trump’s national security adviser for a time. In Bolton’s memoir, he proudly states that “Everyone knew the decision in Buckley v. Valeo could determine … the future shape of American politics.” Bolton was right — and his long-ago efforts continue to bear fruit today.

Watergate was, among other things, a scandal about money in politics. President Richard Nixon’s 1972 reelection campaign had accepted bribes, including $200,000 from the chairman of the board of McDonald’s in return for permission from the federal government to raise the price of their Quarter Pounder cheeseburger. Soon after Nixon resigned in 1974, Congress responded with significant amendments to the Federal Election Campaign Act. This included a new limit of $50,000 per calendar year on what presidential candidates could spend of their own money on their campaign. Adjusting for inflation, that’s about $275,000 today.

Just two years later, however, the Supreme Court struck that limit down in the Buckley case. Those running for political office could now spend any amount of their own fortune they wanted. In fact, the court stated, it could be good for the wealthy to self-fund runs for office, because “the use of personal funds reduces the candidate’s dependence on outside contributions and thereby counteracts the coercive pressures and attendant risks of abuse.”

Read more …

Are we now all free to call each other whatever we want?

Musk’s Defamation Win May Reset Legal Landscape For Social Media (R.)

Elon Musk’s daring has left its mark on electric cars and rockets, and now experts say the entrepreneur may have reshaped U.S. defamation law with his willingness to defend at a high-stakes trial a lawsuit over an off-the-cuff tweet. The victory by Tesla Inc’s outspoken chief executive over a Twitter message describing a British cave explorer as “pedo guy” has raised the bar for what amounts to libel online, according to some legal experts. Musk defended his comments as trivial taunts made on a social media platform that he argued everyone views as a world of unfiltered opinion, which is protected as free speech, rather than statements of fact.

“I think this verdict reflects that there is a feeling that internet tweets and chats are more like casual conversation whether you call it opinion or rhetoric or hyperbole and should not be punished in a lawsuit,” said Chip Babcock, a lawyer who defends against defamation lawsuits. Several other attorneys who specialize in defamation cases privately expressed surprise at the outcome of what they viewed as a strong case for the cave explorer, Vernon Unsworth. They attributed it to Musk’s fame and the perceived youthfulness of the jury. But they also agreed it would shift the legal landscape, undercutting the cases that would have seemed viable before the trial while defendants would use it to try to reduce possible settlement values.

Musk’s court papers cast his comments as part of the rough-and-tumble world of Twitter, which rewards and encourages emotional outbursts and sucks in readers worldwide but that no one takes seriously. Mark Sableman, a lawyer who defends defamation cases, said the freewheeling nature of social media has inevitably changed the understanding of language and what amounts to defamatory factual statements, versus opinion. “I think defendants in modern defamation cases are likely to point to the vitriolic no-holes-barred nature of modern social media, cable TV, and political discourse, in contending that many words and accusations formerly considered defamatory are now understood only as mere opinions, not factual assertions,” he said.

Read more …

“..some $25.6 billion will be taken out of the left Saudi trouser pocket to be put into the right one.”

Saudi Arabia Retreats From The Troubles Its Clown Prince Caused (MoA)

Iran has enabled the Houthi to resist throughout the 5 years of war the Saudis waged on them. Drones and missiles parts provided by Iran to the Houthi allowed them to compel the Saudis to file for peace. It is thereby highly unlikely that the Houthi will dissociate themselves from Iran. They will agree to end their attacks on Saudi Arabia if the Saudis end their attacks on Yemen and pay for the damage their war has caused. If the Saudis do not agree to that more of their helicopters will come down in flames and more of their oil installations will be set on fire. The war on Yemen was started by clown prince Muhammad bin Salman who was then Defense Minister of Saudi Arabia.

He had hoped for a fast victory but the well equipped Saudi military proved to be incapable of defeating barefoot Houthi in the mountains of north Yemen. The war costs the Saudis several billions per month and threatened to ruin the state. Muhammad Bin Salman’s other projects did not go any better. He had planned to sell shares of Saudi Aramco at international stock exchanges and at a total valuation of 2 trillion dollar. The move was supposed to bring in $100 billion to finance a further industrialization of the Saudi economy. After many delays Saudi Aramco is now finally making its initial public offering. The shares will start trading on December 11. But the stock will only be listed at the Saudi Tadawul exchange.

The initial share price offer puts the value of the company at $1.7 trillion which is higher than the $1.5 trillion estimate international banks had published. Today the Saudis announced a large cut in their oil output to increase the global oil prices and the company’s valuation. That might attract more urgently needed buyers to the IPO. But the stocks will still be sold to mainly domestic entities, if needed with some pressure. Instead of attracting $100 billion of fresh money from abroad some $25.6 billion will be taken out of the left Saudi trouser pocket to be put into the right one. The economic benefit for the country is dubious.

Two and a half years ago the clown prince tried to attack and occupy Qatar. The given ideological reason was the Qatari support for the Muslim Brotherhood. But the real reason was the Saudi need for more money which MbS tried to gain through a real estate and resource grab. The project failed when Turkish troops came to Qatar’s aid.

Read more …

 

 

 

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Home Forums Debt Rattle December 7 2019

This topic contains 12 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  WES 11 months, 4 weeks ago.

Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
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  • #51995

    Dorothea Lange Homeless mother and child walking from Phoenix to Imperial County CA Feb 1939   • Donald Trump and Jerome Powell Can ‘Take Another
    [See the full post at: Debt Rattle December 7 2019]

    #51996

    V. Arnold
    Participant

    Dorothea Lange Homeless mother and child walking from Phoenix to Imperial County CA Feb 1939
    That is a picture that tells a story; it’s written all over that woman’s face.
    A hard scrabble life, kept alive by hope…
    Why else would she walk from Arizona to mid California with her child?
    True grit that…………

    #51997

    V. Arnold
    Participant

    Oh boy! Let’s rejoice!
    USDA says strong jobs report supports cutting food stamps.
    Do you believe that? I mean; the strong jobs report.
    Well, it’s bullshit! The jobs are not living wages; most minimum wages; but, oh what the hell; let’s cut food stamps; because we can!
    And, it is money better spent on inflated government wages for workers who count; not you rif-raf who are hopeless losers……………………………………………………….

    #51999

    Dr. D
    Participant

    Abenomics has Failed Japan. Financial Times Wants to Make it Global. (Lacalle)”

    Correlation is not causality. Yes, I believe the BoJ caused the problem, but they were in an unavoidable demographic slowdown…in addition to the generation turning where children never hungry ask “Why am I working 110 hours a week again?” This is why banks need to grow AND shrink, expand AND contract. But leveraged systems cannot contract without collapsing, EVER. It’s just that in gold systems, those weak banks fail, vanish, are bought up, it’s painful, and life goes on. In a fiat system, nobody ever fails, EVER, because that’s Capitalism. Oh wait, I meant the exact OPPOSITE of Capitalism, welfare and socialism for the rich, and austerity and failure for the poor, just like every other time in socialist history.

    Once you get involved and screw it all up, it becomes impossible to tell where, exactly, the screw-ups are anymore – they’re in every market the BoJ touched, with Yen-carry, every market on planet Earth, but you CAN say they’re responsible. …Or catastrophically, fatally, IRresponsible, your choice.

    Thanks to them, both Japan, and its people, are entirely and completely defenseless and unprepared for, say, China to man-handle them. I’m sure the animae grass-eating girly boys will put up a Kamikaze-like sacrifice and defense. Oh, and like here, if you’re the upper half of coastal-land. If you’re the lower half, you’re already dodging gunfire in the streets.

    What the ‘Expert’ Panel Should Have Told You About Impeachment (ET)

    A very must read for the language-drift since 1789. A “High Crime” is a felony. Murder, etc. A “Misdemeanor” or “High Misdemeanor” is a large, not small, breach of fiduciary duty. Embezzlement, commingling, etc. Bribery speaks for itself, but I’d be pretty sure they meant Brib-ee, not Brib-er. Not that it matters, because his other point is, this HAS TO BE UNUSUAL. If every other president and diplomat, leverages, arm-twists, and de-facto bribes foreign nations every day (and they sure do) then it is not a breach of the office, but a continuation of it. …Not to bring up that since they ARE all corrupt, and it IS the common, usual thing, and has been for 50 or 100 years, then you have a problem making a criminal case of it, even when your unauthorized charity that lacks accounting and files no papers, and provides no services, receives a few hundred billion in “donations” each year, but then somehow has no “donations” as soon as you leave office. Or provides no-bid or so-specifically-bid contracts that only one company (Amazon) can possibly receive the dough, who then buy up a paper and soft-peddle the bidder’s line (CIA). Hey, isn’t that bribery? …But nations have solved this before, as with saying “From here forward” or “provide general amnesty” as happened in the Civil War and Prohibition, when Budweiser rolled up a wagonload of fully-finished beer with Clydesdales, the day after liberation. (Libation?)

    He makes the point I make, which is that, so what if if helps him? If it’s his job, there’s obviously no conflict, otherwise he’d have to always do the OPPOSITE of his own beliefs and wishes. And in #OppositeLand, I’m sure that’s no shock. It’s only when he undercuts the well-being of his client, the U.S., that it can apply. …Which is what the detractors said. However, when you can make the argument that looking FOR corruption is good and a duty, and harassing your political opponents is bad and a caution, you have a viable disagreement on public policy, which is debated, then voted through your representative, not impeached. They just disagree on policy, fine, I respect and encourage that, however, you cannot REMOVE for policy disagreements, nor can you thwart it. …I mean, unless you want to go to the streets against a party holding 90% of our 300 million guns. …Which I think they do, suggesting they’ve never read a history book or been in a fistfight.

    A Fraught Moment (Kunstler)”

    Everyone seems to have lost their cool: Kunstler, Tim Pool, Pelosi, Biden. Did they not know it’s been this same way since the 90s? There’s nothing new here except the level and the brazenness. Do they not remember Cheney attacked the whole press, Plame’s CIA, General Shinsaki, and the DIXIE CHICKS of all people, for no reason except they were totally, completely right? At the same time, Mueller attacked a totally innocent scientist and tried to railroad him for chemical weapons and attempted murder. Epstein was setting up shop with an ex-Mossad gal, yet neither the FBI or CIA could find any-old-thing about him when he met with hundreds of protected top-level officials and their expert bodyguard security teams. The movie “Narcos” was on, where Pablo Escobar openly says he moved hundred-billions for the CIA rat-lines through the SWIFT banking system, buys jumbo jets, and nobody can find nothin’. This is when Magintsky and Browder were around and Martin Armstrong was serving 7-to-life for contempt of court because he wouldn’t turn over his trading program to Goldman Sachs. This is when Clinton attacked and then occupied the Serbian oil pipeline and bombed an aspirin factory in Africa. Hey dudes and dudettes, where’ya been? Why lose your mind now, when we can finally talk about it?

    what was the world’s leading law enforcement agency.”

    I’m confused, he says this, then refers to the FBI, an agency set up by J.Edgar to spy on congressmen and other connected people for blackmail and political gain. Is he suggesting there was a single year that wasn’t their mission and purpose? ‘Cause I haven’t seen it.

    FBI teaches its agents never to engage in activity on FBI phones or in a public forum that reveals personal bias.”

    This poor guy believes that is not the specific PURPOSE of the FBI, to protect pedophile Epstein congressmen, lose FBI and IRS hard drives, fabricate evidence against Congressmen in Alaska and scientists in Ft. Dietrich, railroad Leonard Peltier they admit they have no evidence to hold, and that prosecuting the people who walked free is just a cover operation for it. Why don’t you ask MLK and his family about it?

    But to look on the bright side, that I can say these things without the FBI arresting me does show that despite all the U.S. is better than the E.U. or U.K., much less nations further down the list, and that’s why people are still breaking IN here, and not OUT. Lookin’ at you, Mr. Robinson. Jesus loves you more than you will know, ’cause England does not.

    Bloomberg On His Democratic Rivals: ‘Trump Would Eat ‘Em Up’ (R.)

    Quite expectedly – and pointed out by Kunstler – Bloomberg’s entry into the 17-way race has just screwed the only viable moderate out of winning: Buttigeig. And he was alright, I don’t mind him. But Bloomberg is trying to be the centrist anti-Biden, except he’s ALSO 80, and he ALSO attacks blacks, is a corrupt billionaire and so on. So if you run two annoying, self-serving Manhattan billionaires, who do you think will win? Not Bloomberg as his base hates billionaires, stop and frisk, men, and white people. The Trump-pets don’t care. And they don’t care AS LONG as he goes up and smashes Warren, Biden, Bloomberg, Cooper, Macron, the EU, NATO, the CIA, the FBI, and every double-crossing ambassador and Harvard law professor right in the face, on Twitter, every day. It’s only if he STOPPED tweeting, attacking, and being mean to these smug, entitled idiots that he’d be in trouble.

    Are we now all free to call each other whatever we want?

    Nope. Only billionaires. Musk sued someone looking at his corporate releases and stopped his free speech and mild opinion on matters of legal record. Musk effectively told the SEC to lay off him and go f—k themselves…many times. They obeyed entirely. Don’t worry, if Solomon Tweets links to 11 items of factual, legal, photocopied evidence, he’ll be sued to the moon. Just like me. And you. And be thankful they don’t arrest you for something fabricated like Mueller and Obama did, and hold you until death with no charges or merely contempt of court.

    But we ain’t like the middle ages, like the bad old days, iz we? No, we’re brilliant, smart, gifted, moral, exceptional.

    #52005

    zerosum
    Participant

    “Japan has ballooned to more than 100% of the country’s GDP, the central bank owns almost 70% of the country’s ETFs and is one of the top 10 shareholders in the majority of the largest companies of the Nikkei index.
    The QQE program was based on three “arrows”: monetary policy, government spending, and structural reforms.”

    Its not the way it used to be but guess what …. the rich are still rich, the enablers are still being paid to keep the rich rich, and the rif-raf are no worst off.

    ” ….welfare and socialism for the rich, and austerity and failure for the poor, just like every other time in socialist history.” – Dr. D
    —–
    “But we ain’t like the middle ages, like the bad old days, iz we? No, we’re brilliant, smart, gifted, moral, exceptional. ” – Dr. D
    You forgot lier, educated, enabler, politician, rich, powerful, manipulator

    #52006

    zerosum
    Participant

    There are a lot of liers hiding in the bushes
    https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2019/12/ukraine_was_the_origin_of_the_trumprussia_collusion_hoax.html
    December 6, 2019
    Ukraine was the Origin of the Trump-Russia Collusion Hoax
    By Lawrence Sellin

    #52007

    zerosum
    Participant

    Rudi is busy in the Ukraine.

    RUDY NUKES DEMOCRATS: Ukrainians Find Misuse of $5.3 BILLION in US Aid During Obama Admin

    RUDY NUKES DEMOCRATS: Ukrainians Find Misuse of $5.3 BILLION in US Aid During Obama Admin
    by Jim Hoft December 6, 2019

    According to Rudy’s sources — Much of the $5.3 billion in US Aid Ukraine reported as misused was given to the embassy’s favored NGO’s.
    At the time Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch, witness for the Witchunt, was the Ambassador. That embassy directed the police not to investigate.

    #52008

    BrandX
    Participant

    Raúl,

    Love your stuff but …

    Please disable the autoplay on the videos you post (or don’t post videos with autoplay), it’s unbearable getting bombarded with Fox News blasting music and vocals. The Fox News autoplay video in this post does not even have a click off feature. They do that to boost their video plays and rankings.

    Autoplay is disgusting.

    Thanks,
    BrandX

    #52009

    zerosum
    Participant

    This good news for mexico.
    https://in.reuters.com/article/us-mexico-pemex-idUSKBN1YB046
    December 6, 2019 / 9:01 PM / Updated 12 hours ago
    Mexico’s Pemex announces discovery of ‘giant’ crude oil deposit

    #52010

    BrandX,

    I noticed that earlier today and thought about asking people if it happened to them too. And then that slipped my mind. But you’re right, it’s terrible. I’ve posted some of their videos before and don’t remember this happening. I’ll keep an eye on it.

    #52012

    zerosum
    Participant

    The more you spend, then the safer you will be from attack. /s
    The system has been set up so that objections are ineffective in making changes.

    http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/52663.htm
    NATO Dinosaur Plods On
    By Finian Cunningham

    December 06, 2019
    “An extra $400 billion will be forked out by the alliance by 2024, said Stoltenberg, on top of the current $1 trillion.
    Already NATO’s total budget is 20 times that of Russia and five times that of China.

    #52013

    zerosum
    Participant

    I’m hoping that by finding and posting interesting news that it will help TAE become more attractive. (I’m retired with time on my hand)
    I remember Trump saying that he donated to both parties so that whoever won would be in his pocket. ( my words)
    However, it does happen all the time. That’s how quid pro quo works. See this article.

    Who’s Really Behind a $1 Million Donation to Trump’s Inauguration?

    December 5, 2019
    Who’s Really Behind a $1 Million Donation to Trump’s Inauguration?
    A federal indictment raises new questions.

    Dan Friedman

    The charges paint a picture of an effort by Nader to gain influence with Clinton’s supporters, and to hedge his bets by cultivating Trump’s team—all while reporting back to unnamed foreign masters.

    #52017

    WES
    Participant

    Very interesting comment by ex-FBI Jeff Cortese. Lone Wolf jury members refusing to convict anyone investigated by FBI even if defendant is guilty!

    I have read many people saying that if they were on a jury they would not convict based upon FBI evidence either, because they no longer trust the FBI. I had always taken these statements with a grain of salt. But I guess some little people really does have principles! My! My!

    A little judge storyline.

    My late Father was on a jury. The defense and prosecutor both agreed that the defendant had killed the victim. The jury was to decide whether it was 2nd degree or manslaughter. A simple verdict to reach.

    The trial started Monday. Tuesday the judge causually mentioned he was planning on going fishing on the weekend. The trial wrapped up Thursday morning.

    Instead of the jury starting deliberations after lunch, the judge dismissed the jury for the rest of the day. The jury would begin deliberations Friday morning instead.

    This royally pissed my Father off as he didn’t appreciate his valuable time being wasted! An engineer by profession, he didn’t suffer fools very well!

    All day Friday, my Father hung the jury! Friday evening the hung jury was dismissed until Saturday morning!

    At 9:05 AM Saturday the jury promptly convicted the defendant of the lessor charge of manslaughter!

    The judge did not get to leave early Friday morning to go fishing! In fact he didn’t go fishing at all!

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