Debt Rattle March 31 2021

 

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  • #72172
    Germ
    Participant

    WHO joins Europe, Merck in recommending against ivermectin for COVID-19

    https://uk.news.yahoo.com/joins-europe-merck-recommending-against-150854265.html?

    #72173
    madamski
    Participant

    @ Mr. House

    “@island raider They want us to die dude.”

    On first pass, I read “dude” as ‘nude’. Cracked me up. Ten months from now, Fauci makes one last desperate attempt to fleece us: “Everyone must now be absolutely at all times indoors or outdorrs in clement weather, or I’ll do my Sinatra impersonation, swear to god!” Thanx so much for that hallucination.

    They Called Hir the Nekkid Kid

    #72174
    madamski
    Participant

    Omigod. CHSmith sometimes coins an instant classic:

    “The next two charts illustrates the sole dynamic driving assets higher: the Fed is the greater fool. Assets are chasing their own tails higher, completely disconnected from the real world…”

    #72175
    Germ
    Participant

    “Ivermectin administration results in rapid recovery after COVID-19 without pulmonary complications and inpatient treatment.” –

    https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&u=https://noviniplus.bg7.eu/597357/

    #72176
    WES
    Participant

    Michael Reid:

    I suspect there were many people from Quebec here in Toronto after 1972. I was born in Montreal but only because there was no hospital in the mine up north.

    After finishing high school in 1972, I had to leave Quebec because I couldn’t get into any schools in Quebec to continue my education because we were English. All my high school classmates left Quebec for the same reason. I don’t think it was a matter of poor marks. Our high school was very good. Everyone I know of that left, did very well.

    Both my brother (UofT & UW) and sister (St. Lawrence & Ryerson) went to Ontario too. It was a sad time for us because growing up in Montreal was great. I sometimes say my family ended up leaving Quebec as economic refuges. Quebec loss while Ontario gained.

    That is why the family cottage is in the 1000 islands, half way between Montreal and Toronto. Expo ’67 completed the 401 to Montreal. My Father could see the writing on the wall and correctly predicted what would happen. Later in 1973 he got transferred to Toronto in the head office exitus.

    #72177
    zerosum
    Participant

    Koelsen Fischer said she did not get to see the raw data and had to rely on an analysis of the data that was presented to her.
    I would assume that the raw data was in Chinese, (mandarin), and that the Members of the international team cannot read/write Chinese.

    https://www.who.int/health-topics/coronavirus/origins-of-the-virus
    WHO-convened Global Study of the Origins of SARS-CoV-2

    Members of the international team:

    Prof. Dr. Thea Fisher, MD, DMSc(PhD) (Nordsjællands Hospital, Denmark)
    Prof. John Watson (Public Health England, United Kingdom)
    Prof. Dr. Marion Koopmans, DVM PhD (Erasmus MC, Netherlands)
    Prof. Dr. Dominic Dwyer, MD (Westmead Hospital, Australia)
    Vladimir Dedkov, Ph.D (Institute Pasteur, Russia)
    Dr. Hung Nguyen-Viet, PhD (International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), Vietnam)
    PD. Dr. med vet. Fabian Leendertz (Robert Koch-Institute, Germany)
    Dr. Peter Daszak, Ph.D (EcoHealth Alliance, USA)
    Dr. Farag El Moubasher, Ph.D (Ministry of Public Health, Qatar)
    Prof. Dr. Ken Maeda, PhD, DVM (National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Japan)
    The international team also includes five WHO experts led by Dr Peter Ben Embarek; two Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) representatives and two World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) representatives.

    #72178
    Michael Reid
    Participant

    @WES

    So I have been a bad termite today cutting wood for next winter especially the trees interfering with my solar arrays. I find cutting wood is the best time to reflect on my thoughts.

    So I have been reflecting on why I didn’t respond. Yes I did not have much to offer but maybe it is because you have accomplished what I would consider a successful life; marriage, child and home within your wife. These are the things that I have wanted and I was not capable of. I am no genius and in fact I feel my engineering way of life and turbocharged work ethic where work was always first probably prevented me from achieving those goals. But there are other reasons.

    Like you all of the people from my hometown in Toronto were economic refugees. I grew up in an isolated fishing output in Newfoundland. The destruction of the fishery is a good example of capitalist extraction of renewable resource that eventually resulted in fishery collapse. I realize this is to be expected in mining.

    I reflect on my life. I have never felt economically secure and I have never felt secure in relationship to achieve my goals. Perhaps I should have stayed in my hometown because I would have achieved my goals here but I would not have seen the world and had all of those very interesting experiences and gained all that knowledge

    #72179
    V. Arnold
    Participant

    Re: yesterday…
    Sativa for sure. Indica is for zombies…
    😉

    #72180
    sumac.carol
    Participant

    The Quebec exodus. I don’t really get it. In Europe learning and being exposed to multiple languages is a given. In Canada, having to learn a second language means pulling up stakes and moving to another place. Intelligent people can master all manner of skills, techno-lingo, but not French. (Note that the converse is rarely true and the French readily pick up English.)This looks very much to me like a psychological barrier, born of tribal tendencies.

    #72181
    Michael Reid
    Participant

    @ sumac.carol

    I have done lots of French education and with a Quebec girl for 9 years but I am not fluent. One needs to working in the language and living in the language of the people around you. I have no problem getting what I need but an intellectual conversation is not going to happen

    #72182
    V. Arnold
    Participant

    sumac.carol
    This looks very much to me like a psychological barrier, born of tribal tendencies.

    I would agree with you on that.
    Thai is one of the 7 most difficult languages (according to experts) on the planet.
    I am still learning to speak; but can go out by myself with little problem for shopping or just sight seeing…
    Most foreigners (western) rely on their girlfriends for all communication not in English…
    Before retiring, my Thai wife was an English teacher for a government highschool.
    I also taught English at a government highschool; but a different one than my wife.
    Being a lazy sort, my Thai has suffered because my wife speaks English so well… 😉

    #72183
    sumac.carol
    Participant

    Michael Reid and V. Arnold -Way to Go on your language learning efforts. I totally agree it is easier to learn when the option of switching to English is not there. I too find that language capacity can be limited depending on context – I speak a third language, but learned it living with a family. We only had everyday type of conversations — nothing political. So, I’m fine talking about cooking, cleaning, who took out the garbage, hand tools, but no good at all on politics. Maybe that was a good thing 😉

    #72184
    John Day
    Participant

    @WES:
    Bismark was brilliant, like Putin/Lavrov level of competence.
    The British Empire was appropriately aghast.
    That dude was as brilliant at statecraft, and really moving German society in healthy directions, as Marx was at diagnosing Capitalism as a patient.

    #72185
    madamski
    Participant

    John Day

    Bismark was indeed the shiznets of modern large industrial nation-states. *swoon*

    #72186

    I’m still trying to wrap my head around parents wanting to get their children vaccinated for this virus which doesn’t hurt children. I’m still seeing Fauci as evil for saying “vaccinate the children!”
    Something else is going on. Something bigger than we know- some secret language we comprehend but don’t know we know; some frequency of compliance that comes through the phone or the TV; something so comprehensively awful that fancier people are willing to trigger the switch that makes 80% of the population in thrall. Is it really that the people are such sheeple?
    We are going to stick this stuff into kids. They can’t consent, can they? Adults have a right to refuse the vaccine, but what about the kids?
    Fauci. Grrrrrr. Just as I felt about him in the 80s.
    I remember my elders. They would never have said- to protect myself, I am willing to put my great-grandchildren at risk. Now it’s okay to say this. This isn’t human. What’s going on?
    Sorry to seem of-topic, but this all I can think of lately. They want to inject children. It bothers me.

    #72187
    V. Arnold
    Participant

    They want to inject children. It bothers me.

    And well it should, IMO.
    It bothers the hell out of me…
    This comes to mind

    Buffalo Springfield – Stop Children What’s That Sound

    There’s something happening here
    What it is ain’t exactly clear
    There’s a man with a gun over there
    Telling me i got to beware
    I think it’s time we stop, children, what’s that sound
    Everybody look what’s going down
    There’s battle lines being drawn
    Nobody’s right if everybody’s wrong
    Young people speaking their minds
    Getting so much resistance from behind
    I think it’s time we stop, hey, what’s that sound
    Everybody look what’s going down
    What a field-day for the heat
    A thousand people in the street
    Singing songs and carrying signs
    Mostly say, hooray for our side
    It’s time we stop, hey, what’s that sound
    Everybody look what’s going down
    Paranoia strikes deep Into your life it will creep
    It starts when you’re always afraid
    You step out of line, the man come and take you away
    We better stop, hey, what’s that sound
    Everybody look what’s going down
    Stop, hey, what’s that sound
    Everybody look what’s going down
    Stop, now, what’s that sound
    Everybody look what’s going down
    Stop, children, what’s that sound
    Everybody look what’s going down

    #72188
    V. Arnold
    Participant

    #72189
    Michael Reid
    Participant

    @ my parents said know

    I don’t know but I wonder. Is it the preamble for a mass culling? Sad thought but sometimes my mind works that way

    #72190
    Michael Reid
    Participant

    @ V. Arnold

    Thank you for the song

    #72191
    VietnamVet
    Participant

    madamski,

    Seasonal flu and coronaviruses are two different pathogens.

    Aside from increasing corporate profit margins at the expense of the lives of hundreds of thousands of citizens, the greatest failing of governments across Europe and the Americas is the belief that the viruses are similar. From the Diamond Princess petri-dish on, it was clear that the coronavirus is deadly to the old and infirm, 14 died on the ship. Also, the virus is highly contagious; around 75% of passengers and crew were infected and around 40% were asymptomatic. Drs. Anthony Fauci and Deborah Brix did not grasp the difference. They could not. Their positions and salary required it – profits over lives.

    What New Zealand and Australia are doing to control the virus is what necessary to eradicate the virus in the rest of the world; universal testing, contact tracing, closing international and internal state borders around hot spots, safe paid quarantines, and bubbles for work and school. The USA, UK, Belgium, Brazil etc. do not have functional governments that can do this. France is going into a fourth lockdown.

    Coronavirus is transmitted by aerosols; apparently not by fomites. Much stricter public health measures are required for coronavirus than with the seasonal flu. Another failing is testing. A cheap paper test (like a pregnancy test) is still not available for the simple reason it disrupts laboratory and clinician money making schemes. Also, there is insufficient population and variant testing.

    If everyone uses the antigen test to see that they are not infectious before going out in public for two months, the virus would be eradicated. This requires governments going on a war footing (It is disruptive and expensive) plus trust in people and democracy. This is why the pandemic response in the West has failed to date.

    Yes, coronavirus vaccines work. They prevent hospitalization and death. They were rushed into use because they make money and there is no alternative in the Western Empire. AstraZeneca’s vaccine is being limited to over 55 in Europe due blood clotting issues. This is not unexpected since there are no long term animal tests with the mRNA jabs.

    The vaccines do hinder the transmission of coronavirus. But there are positive tests in vaccinated populations. Apparently there is around a 10% transmission rate for the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines and 50% for AstraZeneca.

    The vaccines will not eradicate the virus by themselves. The unvaccinated in Europe and the Americas will be at risk for long haul COVID and death including catching it from the vaccinated.

    “Imminent doom” is an apt term for the bleak future where variants keep mutating and there are more and more victims of the private/public information campaign to sell vaccine jabs without providing public health care for all.

    #72192
    Michael Reid
    Participant

    @VietnamVet

    Look at the number of people who have died and compare it with previous years for flu deaths. Aren’t they similar but a little higher.

    All these restrictions and I think live until you die and that life should be minimally restricted.

    #72193
    WES
    Participant

    Michael Reid:

    I should have guessed you were a Newfie! An Islander too!
    While born in Montreal, the mine was located in Schefferville, Quebec for political reasons. The mine’s railway yards and many mining pits were located in Labrador, about a mile from town!
    My brother and sisters were born there, so they are almost Newfies!
    I was probably conceived up there, so I am claiming honorary Newfie citizenship!
    My brother worked in Labrador City as a shovel supervisor, so he can speak real Newfie!

    I took exactly what you took at DeVry! I have also worked with DerVry grads. After graduating I couldn’t find a job in Canada, so I ended up working for a mining equipment manufacturer in Milwaukee. I had one big strike against me. I was hard of hearing!

    My Mother said after moving from friendly Schefferville down to Montreal, when I was 10, I changed quite a bit. She said I started to became much more interverted. Schooling became much more difficult for me. I went from a small class of maybe 12 or 15 to suddenly dealing with four grade 5 classes of 30 students! Of course the peer competition was much tougher!

    My parents moved because they knew I needed to go to a better school if I was going to succeed in life. My Father gave up his career as chief engineer so the move wasn’t taken lightly. Also I suffer from severe allergies just to add to my troubles! The family’s health was also a big factor in moving to Montreal.

    I can say in Montreal I never really developed any real close friends like I had up north. I knew lots of people. Going to Ryerson, I stayed in a student residence for the first year. This forced me to meet new people which was good for me. I got mono just before December in my first semester. I didn’t know what was wrong with me so I kept studying harder but continued to fail every course. I went back home to Montreal telling my parents I had completely wiped out! Then I got my marks in the mail after Xmas. I had passed everything reasonably well! I knew nothing about Bell curving of marks nor that everybody else in my class was also failing every test! The mono hit me so hard and lasted for so long that I wiped out my 2nd semester. This put me out of sync with my year. Being too stupid, I kept going until they kicked me out!

    Here is the strange part. So I maybe know something about electrons, but the firm in Milwaukee required me to do mostly mechanical stuff! You know like heavy welding, gearboxes, heavy metal construction, etc. So I learned all that stuff by work experience! Now mining equipment has electric motors and controls but you only get to test that stuff after months and months of mechanical stuff! The company’s problem was if they hired a mechanical engineer then once the machine was built they would have to send out an electrical engineer to commission the machine. Since they still had to teach the mechanical engineers how to build their machines, it made sense to hire an electrical engineer and train him on the mechanical stuff! However as I found out many mechanical engineers knew plenty about electricity, Anyway I got hired! Oh, yes the only other question I got asked by 6 different supervisors was did I like to travel? I knew the correct a swear to that question! Yes! But of course I didn’t know because I had never travelled alone before in my entire life!

    I remember one ex-navy (Peal Harbor- 1st ship out of harbor dec 7th!) supervisor said to me. “Do you know what you are getting into? Look when you go to the washroom the middle of the night, you are doing it company time! Do you understand! We own you 24/7! He wasn’t kidding either! If you ever said “No” you were fired!

    The job paid poorly but it gave me 3 things I badly needed. Work experience, forced me to constantly meet new people (throw him into the water and see if he sinks or swims!) in new places, and build better self confidence.

    Oh, yes I finally learned how to write a sentance! I had to do detailed weekly service reports for 8 years. God that alone nearly killed me! God really had it out for me! I failed English every year! My Father just kept saying you will make a good engineer! (Little did I know then that in my second/third career I would become a technical writer! Just God punishing me for not being able to write! I did figure out a picture/diagram/CAD drawing is worth a 1,000 words!)

    Now in my old age I can’t seem to stop writing! Sorry if I have bent your ear!

    But I also want to say relationships with women never came easy for me either! The number of women I have dated can be counted on one hand! At 40, I married a hard of hearing/deaf woman with learning disabilities. We had a hell of a time having children as she was over 35. So we have had our ups and downs for sure. Our son shares his Mom’s learning disabilities but my daughter is wired more like me.

    Then about 50, I was diagnosed with Ushers Sydrome, meaning I am going both deaf and blind! Naturally they took my drivers license away from me! Now I am only allowed to drive grocery carts but even those days are numbered! It is only a matter of time before some woman beats the crap out of me, after I T-bone her grocery cart, thinking I deliberately did it! I have already had you know those dirty looks only women can give!

    #72194
    V. Arnold
    Participant

    @Michael Reid
    @ V. Arnold

    Thank you for the song

    You’re very welcome. I was somewhat shocked I was able to post it… 😉

    #72195
    Michael Reid
    Participant

    @WES

    Yeah we might get told to get a room. Nice to meet you

    #72293
    Noirette
    Participant

    Wes what an interesting life history. You are the miner guy, right?

    I was thinking about, I once visited a mine in Keele (GB) as an ‘exclusive’ visit, it was fascinating. It is afaik closed today. But I got to, with 5 others, go up and down, visit, crawl around, etc. About 25 years ago, was sent there by Gvmt. and the visit to the mine was one of several ‘sorties’ proposed by the hosts – other were chamber music and a Shakespeare play – ha ha – only 6 ppl inscribed for the mine. Which was great, as we had all the old miners attention, much history etc. Spent the day and didn’t go the programmed dinner, beer and sanwiches with the ex-miners.

    As for mines in Switz. – not coal – but for ex. salt. I can recommend this, the visit is good, of course touristy, yet fascinating, well worth it. (Went last year.)

    https://www.myswitzerland.com/en-ch/experiences/salt-mines/

    #72331
    Michael Reid
    Participant

    @ madamski

    I cannot find your post to reference and maybe I dreamed you thought I had figured out something about yourself but I know nothing about you really other than you are brilliant.

    So the continuation of my story is that I was laid off from General Dynamics Canada during the 2009 downturn.

    So I am thinking what am I going to do with my life? So I am thinking let’s try to make the world better than making all this nasty shit.

    I decided to do registered nursing in my home province probably influenced that I am very attracted to nurses. Anyway I am close to home and the people that I love.

    When I started to really respond to you it’s because I am a nurse and you needed some nursing and I am pleased how you have resurrected yourself.

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