Oct 132013
 
 October 13, 2013  Posted by at 10:12 am Finance
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German magazine Der Spiegel managed to get an exclusive peek into a forthcoming report from a European Parliament special committee. While there’s always a risk that such reports will be used to serve primarily as a blunt tool to intensify political, legal and – increasingly cross-border – police control of Europe’s sovereign nations, it’s nevertheless also simply shocking in its findings. It will receive a lot more attention in the near future, especially when the European Parliament is set to discuss it on October 23. Unfortunately, given the ongoing disaster that is the EU’s handling of its financial problems – and the thousands who are left to die trying to reach Europe’s shores -, it’s hard to be overly optimistic about the way this issue will be dealt with. Besides, of course, there is a substantial risk the numbers might be much higher still, since Brussels based committees will tend to look only at what they can prove.

 

Here’s my translation of today’s Spiegel article:

 

In Europa leben 880.000 Sklavenarbeiter (880,000 People In Europe Are Slave Laborers)

 

Around 880,000 people in the EU are slave laborers, and more than a quarter of them are being exploited sexually, according to CRIM, a special committee for the European Parliament which investigates organized crime, money laundering and corruption in Europe.

Criminal gangs make a yearly profit of some €25 billion in human trade; this results in damage to the economy of over €100 billion in the EU.

3600 criminal organizations are active in the European Union. Besides the €25 billion in human trade, they make a €18-26 billion profit trading human organs and wild animals, while cybercrime causes €290 billion in damage.

Corruption costs the EU €120 billion per year; in the public sector alone, 20 million cases of corruption were registered.

Some of the committee recommendations:

• European tax havens must disappear

• Buying votes should be made a criminal offense in all countries

• Everyone convicted for money laundering or corruption should be banned from public functions for at least 5 years

• Whistleblower protection needs to be strengthened, so that no-one exposing corruption either in government or private business can be prosecuted

 

 

Photo top:George N. Barnard Auction and Negro Sales 1864

Whitehall Street, Atlanta during General Sherman’s occupation of the city

 

 

Home Forums 880,000 People In Europe Are Slave Laborers

This topic contains 2 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Viscount St. Albans 1 year ago.

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October 13, 2013 at 10:12 am #9098

Raúl Ilargi Meijer

German magazine Der Spiegel managed to get an exclusive peek into a forthcoming report from a European Parliament special committee. While there’s alw
[See the full post at: 880,000 People In Europe Are Slave Laborers]

October 13, 2013 at 3:21 pm #9333

jal

The elites have only one approved system of slavery …

????

!!!!

A rose is a rose by any name.

October 15, 2013 at 4:20 am #9335

Viscount St. Albans

Went for a brisk stroll in a county park in Kent County, Delaware. Noted that the parking lot was carpeted with nearly equal parts squashed Woolly Bear caterpillars and live Woolly Bears attempting to cross the treacherous asphault terrain separating one grass patch from another. Observed with interest that children pointed-out to their parents the mass migration in our midst, and then observed SUVs containing said children proceeding to plaster a good 10-20 wriggling furballs under rubber tread as vehicles exited the parkland. Isn’t mother nature fascinating? Living beings responding to non-negotiable instinctual migratory patterns. Other living beings beating a path to the local waffle house for breakfast, caterpillar guts smeared and caked into the tire treads as a consequence of the need to fill bellies with cake batter and syrup. But we all agree to feign guilt and sadness when the BBC casts its mircoscopic lens on the anatomy of the agony. I wonder if the BBC documentary costs could have saved a good 100 wooly bears, at least.

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