Mar 182019
 
 March 18, 2019  Posted by at 9:58 am Finance Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , ,


Albert Gleizes The football players 1912-13

 

How Boeing, FAA Certified The Suspect 737 MAX Flight Control System (ST)
Boeing’s Doomed 737 Max’s (Margolis)
The EU Has Never Had More Power Over Britain (G.)
Dutch PM Compares Theresa May To Monty Python Limbless Knight (G.)
100,000 Children in UK ‘Could Become Undocumented’ Overnight After Brexit (G.)
‘Pupil Poverty’ Pressure On School Cash (BBC)
With Brexit Approaching UK’s Voice In Brussels Grows Quiet (G.)
Smartphone Shipments In China Collapse To Six Year Low (ZH)
Apartment Values Tipped To Plunge As Much As 50% In Some Sydney Areas (DM)
Ultra Low Wage Growth The Intended Outcome Of Government Policies (Quiggin)
Deutsche Bank And Commerzbank Go Public On Merger Talks (R.)
Saudi Crown Prince Allegedly Stripped Of Some Authority (G.)
Dead Whale Washed Up In Philippines Had 40kg Of Plastic Bags In Stomach (G.)

 

 

As I said on March 15: “If I were New Zealand’s government, and Australia’s, I’d say this is not the time for the countries’ white populations to speak. Let the Maori do the talking instead. It’s their land.”

 

 

Maybe not the kind of thing we should want to be swept under the carpet. But don’t underestimate Boeing’s political power. A series of tweets from a pilot and software engineer sheds a lot of light on what happened with the 737-MAX: one corner cut led automatically to the next one being cut. Until there were no more corners left. Dominoes. Zero Hedge has that series here.

Mike -Mish- Shedlock adds this: “If the above analysis by Trevor Sumner is correct, the planes were too complicated to fly because Boeing cut corners to save money, then did not even have the decency to deliver them with needed warning lights and operation instructions. There may be grounds for a criminal investigation here, not just civil. Regardless, Boeing’s decision to appeal to Trump to not ground the planes is morally reprehensible at best. Trump made the right call on this one, grounding the planes, albeit under international pressure. [..] By the way, if the timelines presented are correct, the FAA got in bed with Boeing, under Obama.”

How Boeing, FAA Certified The Suspect 737 MAX Flight Control System (ST)

As Boeing hustled in 2015 to catch up to Airbus and certify its new 737 MAX, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) managers pushed the agency’s safety engineers to delegate safety assessments to Boeing itself, and to speedily approve the resulting analysis. But the original safety analysis that Boeing delivered to the FAA for a new flight control system on the MAX — a report used to certify the plane as safe to fly — had several crucial flaws. That flight control system, called MCAS (Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System), is now under scrutiny after two crashes of the jet in less than five months resulted in Wednesday’s FAA order to ground the plane.

Current and former engineers directly involved with the evaluations or familiar with the document shared details of Boeing’s “System Safety Analysis” of MCAS, which The Seattle Times confirmed. The safety analysis: • Understated the power of the new flight control system, which was designed to swivel the horizontal tail to push the nose of the plane down to avert a stall. When the planes later entered service, MCAS was capable of moving the tail more than four times farther than was stated in the initial safety analysis document. • Failed to account for how the system could reset itself each time a pilot responded, thereby missing the potential impact of the system repeatedly pushing the airplane’s nose downward. •Assessed a failure of the system as one level below “catastrophic.” But even that “hazardous” danger level should have precluded activation of the system based on input from a single sensor — and yet that’s how it was designed.

The people who spoke to The Seattle Times and shared details of the safety analysis all spoke on condition of anonymity to protect their jobs at the FAA and other aviation organizations. Both Boeing and the FAA were informed of the specifics of this story and were asked for responses 11 days ago, before the second crash of a 737 MAX last Sunday. Late Friday, the FAA said it followed its standard certification process on the MAX. Citing a busy week, a spokesman said the agency was “unable to delve into any detailed inquiries.” Boeing responded Saturday with a statement that “the FAA considered the final configuration and operating parameters of MCAS during MAX certification, and concluded that it met all certification and regulatory requirements.”

Read more …

Nice story, but he seeks to blame Trump instead of the FAA, and that doesn’t go anywhere.

Boeing’s Doomed 737 Max’s (Margolis)

I don’t like flying. I consider it unnatural, unhealthy and fraught with peril. But I do it all the time. For me, it’s either fly or take an ox cart. In fact, I’ve been flying since I was six years old – from New York to Paris on a lumbering Boeing Stratocruiser, a converted, double-decker WWII B-29 heavy bomber. I even had a sleeping berth. So much for progress. Lots can go wrong in the air. Modern aircraft have thousands of obscure parts. If any one of them malfunctions, the aircraft can be crippled or crash. Add pilot error, dangerous weather, air traffic control mistakes, mountains where they are not supposed to be, air to air collisions, sabotage and hijacking.

I vividly recall flying over the snow-capped Alps in the late 1940’s aboard an old Italian three-motor airliner with its port engine burning, and the Italian crew panicking and crossing themselves. Some years ago, I was on my way to Egypt when we were hijacked by a demented Ethiopian. A three day ordeal ensued that included a return flight to New York City from Germany, with the gunman threatening to crash the A-310 jumbo jet into Wall Street – a grim precursor of 9/11. My father, Henry Margolis, got off a British Comet airliner just before it blew up due to faulty windows.

Which brings me to the current Boeing crisis. After a brand new Boeing 737 Max crashed in Indonesia it seemed highly likely that there was a major problem in its new, invisible autopilot system, known as MCAS. All 737 Max’s flying around the world should have been grounded as a precaution. But America’s aviation authority, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), allowed the Max to keep flying. The FAA is half regulator and half aviation business promoter, a clear conflict of interest. The crash of a new Ethiopian 737 Max outside Addis Ababa under very similar circumstances to the Lion Air accident set off alarm bells around the globe.

Scores of airlines rightly grounded their new Max’s. But the US and Canada did not. The FAA continued to insist the aircraft was sound. The problem, it was hinted between the lines, was incompetent third world pilots. It now appears that America’s would-be emperor, Pilot-in–Chief Donald Trump, may have pressed the FAA to keep the 737 Max’s in the air. Canada, always shy when it comes to disagreeing with Washington, kept the 737 Max’s flying until there was a lot of evidence linking the Indonesia and Ethiopian crashes. Trump finally ordered the suspect aircraft grounded. But doing so was not his business. That’s the job of the FAA. But Trump, as usual, wanted to hog the limelight. By now, the 737 Max ban is just about universal.

Read more …

Mess. 11 days left.

The EU Has Never Had More Power Over Britain (G.)

It is easy to assign all the blame to Mrs May, the control freak who lost control. The charge list against her is certainly a lengthy one. She triggered article 50 before her government had an agreed strategy for withdrawal and her senior team then wasted months squabbling with itself rather than advancing the negotiations with the EU. Ignoring advice to the contrary and without advance discussion with her cabinet, she made a prison for herself by laying down red lines that made the negotiations more difficult and set her up for a string of ignominious subsequent reversals. When she threw away her majority at an election she didn’t have to call, she carried on as if nothing had changed rather than trying to reach out to other parties to forge a broad consensus about a way forward.

That made her the hostage of the Democratic Unionist party and the Brexit ultras on the right of her party. Mrs May has one quality that is of value in a political crisis. She has resilience. She lacks all the other ones, such as imagination, advocacy and agility. True, all true, and yet not the whole truth. Any account of this nightmare that holds Mrs May solely culpable is not a complete explanation for how we got here. In a dark corner of what remains of its political brain, the Tory party knows that it is collectively guilty of driving the country it professes to love into this shaming mess. With a few prescient exceptions, the Conservatives all backed David Cameron when he promised a referendum on the cynical basis that he might not have to deliver it and with the arrogant assumption that, if he did have to, he would easily win it.

Read more …

“She reminds me occasionally of that character from Monty Python where all the arms and legs are cut off but he then tells the opponent: ‘Let’s call it a draw.’

Dutch PM Compares Theresa May To Monty Python Limbless Knight (G.)

Theresa May is like the knight in Monty Python and the Holy Grail who loses his arms and legs in a duel and calls it a draw, the Dutch prime minister has said. Mark Rutte, who appeared visibly irritated last week at the failure of MPs to pass the Brexit deal, admitted feeling “angry” at the impasse in Westminster. He said his frustration was focused on the posturing of those seeking to make party political points during a major national crisis but praised May’s “incredible” resilience in the face of repeated knock-backs in the House of Commons. “Look, I have every respect for Theresa May,” Rutte said in an interview with the Dutch broadcaster WNL on Sunday.

“She reminds me occasionally of that character from Monty Python where all the arms and legs are cut off but he then tells the opponent: ‘Let’s call it a draw.’ She’s incredible. She goes on and on. At the same time, I do not blame her, but British politics.” The black knight sketch in the 1975 Monty Python film had John Cleese playing the role of the deluded swordsman who could not admit defeat, even as Graham Chapman’s King Arthur cut off all his limbs. Rutte said of the prime minister’s predicament: “You can see what happens when a country puts everything on the roulette wheel and takes a risk, and the whole thing collapses. That is what is happening. Economic, financial, politically, England is in a very bad position right now.”

Read more …

After 40 years of EU membership, the UK stands to plunge into chaos when 1000s of laws and regulations evaporate. Very predictable, but mostly ignored.

100,000 Children in UK ‘Could Become Undocumented’ Overnight After Brexit (G.)

Thousands of children of EU nationals risk becoming a new “Windrush generation”, a children’s legal charity has said. They are concerned that vulnerable children could become undocumented in the same way as the Caribbean children who came to the UK decades ago only to suffer at the hands of the Home Office’s hostile environment decades later. An estimated 900,000 EU national children are in the UK with about 285,000 born in the country. Coram Children’s Legal Centre fears that children in foster care, in care homes, and others from vulnerable families could slip through the net of the new Home Office registration scheme for EU nationals after Brexit.

The Home Office estimates that between 10% and 20% of all applicants will be vulnerable, unable to provide documentary evidence of their time in the UK. “If just 15% of the current population of EU national children fail to ‘regularise’ their status before the cut-off point, 100,000 children would be added to the UK’s undocumented child population overnight, nearly doubling it [the numbers of existing undocumented children],” said Kamena Dorling, group head of policy and public affairs at Coram. About 5,000 children of EU nationals are separated from their parents and are in care and Coram is calling on the government to force local authorities to identify them now in order to get their settled status before the cut-off point in 2020 or 2021.

Read more …

Dumb headline from BBC for a very real issue: schools care for poor pupils, and then see their funding cut.

‘Pupil Poverty’ Pressure On School Cash (BBC)

Schools in England are having to “pick up the pieces” for families in poverty, including giving food and clothes to children, head teachers warn. But, they say, that is unsustainable when schools are facing “funding cuts”. Heads will raise their concerns at the Association of School and College Leaders’ (ASCL) annual conference. Education Secretary Damian Hinds will tell the conference he is setting up an expert advisory group to help teachers with “the pressures of the job”. The advisory group, including the mental health charity Mind and teachers’ representatives, will look at ways to improve wellbeing among teachers and to tackle stress. [..]

Edward Conway, head of St Michael’s Catholic High School in Watford, says: “Pupil poverty has increased significantly over the past eight years, with us providing food, clothing, equipment and securing funds from charitable organisations to provide essential items such as beds and fridges.” The head teachers’ union has canvassed the views of school leaders, whose comments include: “When schools have to buy shoes for children to wear to school on a regular basis, we must have a problem.” Another head said: “In 24 years of education, I have not seen the extent of poverty like this. “Children are coming to school hungry, dirty and without the basics to set them up for life. “The gap between those that have and those that do not is rising and is stark.”

Read more …

Where Britain is: “sitting in the EU departure lounge.”

With Brexit Approaching UK’s Voice In Brussels Grows Quiet (G.)

For years a British foreign minister has shuttled once a month to Brussels or Luxembourg to meet their European counterparts. The crises of the world have crowded the agenda: from the Arab spring to the annexation of Crimea, coups, stolen elections and intractable wars. Monday, in theory, could be the last time the United Kingdom name plate is on the table. While a Brexit extension is a near-certainty, the official departure date is still 29 March. Uncertainty over exit day requires careful diplomacy. On Monday the British minister will have the chance to weigh in on the EU’s China strategy, ahead of a summit with Beijing on 9 April.

While British officials remain involved in discussions, the UK will hang back on strategic questions about how the EU should approach China. Nobody wants to be seen as lecturing European allies, while sitting in the EU departure lounge. A government spokesperson said: “The UK will continue to take a full part in discussions at the [Foreign Affairs Council], focusing on those issues that matter most to the UK and EU.” Other day-to-day EU business provides a jarring contrast with the government’s Brexit strategy: one of Theresa May’s last acts as an EU leader will be to sign a routine communique on strengthening the single market – the one she insists Britain must leave.

Meanwhile, the UK’s 73 MEPs do not know if they will be out of a job in a fortnight, or in three months. “It is really unsettling, but we are the least people to worry about,” said the Liberal Democrat MEP Catherine Bearder, speaking just outside the chamber in Strasbourg under the strident ring of a voting bell. The uncertainty facing MEPs is nothing, she adds, compared with the unknowns confronting business. “A politician’s life is always uncertain, you never know if you are going to come back for the next mandate.”

Read more …

Radiation.

Smartphone Shipments In China Collapse To Six Year Low (ZH)

Months after Apple stunned the market by announcing it would no longer be reporting quarterly iPhone unit sales, we have some insight as to the reason. February saw smartphone shipments in China collapse to their lowest levels in six years, indicating that the super-saturated industry has failed to turn around amidst a global economy that is grinding slower. Shipments to China came in at 14.5 million units for February, down 19.9% from last year, according to Reuters, who cited the China Academy of Information and Communications Technology. It’s the lowest total since February 2013.

February is traditionally a tough month for Chinese consumer purchases, as the Chinese spend a majority of the month celebrating the new year. However, this year’s drop was more concentrated than past years, as a result of both a slowing economy and the ongoing U.S./China trade war. When Apple recently cut sales forecasts this year, it blamed China for weighing on its results. To try and stimulate demand, the company paired with China-based Ant Financial to offer interest-free iPhone financing. Other retailers in China have tried similar promos to try and spur demand. This has some manufacturers, like Huawei, looking to corner the higher margin end of the market instead. Huawei saw its market share of China’s $500 to $800 device segment rise to 26.6% from 8.8% in 2018, according to data from Counterpoint Research. Apple, on the other hand, saw its share fall to 54.6% from 81.2%.

As an added bonus, we recently reported on Chinese smartphones also emitting the most radiation of any smartphones worldwide. The current smartphone creating the highest level of radiation is the Mi A1 from Chinese vendor Xiaomi. Another Chinese phone is in second place – the OnePlus 5T. In fact, the two companies are represented heavily in a list of “Phones Emitting the Most Radiation” that was recently released by Statista. 8 of the top 16 handsets being made by one of these two companies. Premium Apple phones, such as the iPhone 7 and the iPhone 8 are also here to be seen, as are the latest Pixel handsets from Google.

Read more …

But there’s no bubble.

Apartment Values Tipped To Plunge As Much As 50% In Some Sydney Areas (DM)

Apartment values in Australia’s big cities are set to plunge, with prices in one suburb to plummet as much as 50 per cent according to one industry observer, as Chinese buyers abandon off-the-plan residential tower projects. Ryde, in Sydney’s north, is Australia’s second-worst performing property market with dwelling values diving by 14.8 per cent during the past year, CoreLogic data showed. Digital Finance Analytics founder Martin North, an economist, feared apartment values there could be sliced in half during the next three years before stagnating for a decade. ‘We’ve got massive oversupply in those areas but you’ve just got no demand,’ he told Daily Mail Australia on Friday.

‘Some of the central high-rise apartments in the inner urban areas, like Ryde, 40 per cent now is certainly feasible. ‘In the worst case, you could see unit prices nearly halve.’ Starr Partners chief executive Doug Driscoll, who specialises in the Sydney real estate market, said Mr North’s forecasts were far fetched. He did, however, blame councils for approving too many developments. ‘We had an influx of foreign investment. We had an environment of record low interest rates, money was easily available – these things don’t last forever,’ he told Daily Mail Australia. ‘In some suburbs, in some pockets, we have seen an oversupply.’

Read more …

From Australia, but applicable worldwide.

Ultra Low Wage Growth The Intended Outcome Of Government Policies (Quiggin)

The long debate over the causes of wage stagnation took an unexpected turn last week, when Finance Minister Matthias Cormann described (downward) flexibility in the rate of wage growth as “a deliberate design feature of our economic architecture”. It was a position that was endorsed in a flurry of confusion 16 seconds after it had been rejected by Defence Industry Minister Linda Reynolds. Cormann had said policies aimed at pushing wages up could cause “massive spikes in unemployment”. The ease with which Reynolds was trapped into at first rejecting and then accepting what her ministerial colleague had said flowed from the fact that Cormann had broken one of the standing conventions of politics in Australia, and for that matter, the English-speaking world.

For more than forty years, both the architecture of labour market regulation and the discretionary choices of governments have been designed with the precise objective of holding wages down. These policies have been quite successful, as can be seen from the graph. However, at least until recently, there has been bipartisan agreement on at least one aspect of them – that no one should mention their role in holding back wages. Instead, the decline in the wage share of national income has been variously blamed on • technology • immigration • imports from China and, more recently, • the end of the mining boom. None of these explanations stand up to scrutiny.

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The lame and the blind. Reports should look at the size of Deutsche relative to the German economy, and the nerves that touches in Berlin.

Deutsche Bank And Commerzbank Go Public On Merger Talks (R.)

Deutsche Bank and Commerzbank confirmed on Sunday they were in talks about a merger, prompting labor union concerns about possible job losses and questions from analysts about the merits of a combination. Germany’s two largest banks issued short statements following separate meetings of their management boards, a person with knowledge of the matter said, indicating a quickening of pace in the merger process, although both also warned that a deal was far from certain. “In light of arising opportunities, the management board of Deutsche Bank has decided to review strategic options,” Deutsche said in its statement.

Christian Sewing, Deutsche Bank’s chief executive, told employees that Deutsche still aimed “to remain a global bank with a strong capital markets business… with a global network.”A merged bank would likely be the third largest in Europe after HSBC and BNP Paribas, with roughly 1.8 trillion euros ($2.04 trillion) in assets, such as loans and investments, and a market value of about 25 billion euros. [..] However, skeptics questioned the wisdom of a merger. “We do not see a national champion here, but a shaky zombie bank that could lead to another billion-euro grave for the German state. Why should we take this risk?” said Gerhard Schick, finance activist and ex-member of the German parliament.

While the banks had not publicly commented on merger talks until Sunday, Finance Minister Olaf Scholz last Monday confirmed that there were negotiations. On Sunday, the ministry acknowledged the announcement and said it remained in regular contact with all parties. However, there were signs of political opposition. Hans Michelbach, a lawmaker from the Christian Social Union (CSU), the Bavarian sister party of Chancellor Angela Merkel’s Christian Democratic Union (CDU), urged the government to sell its 15 percent stake in Commerzbank before a deal. “There may not be an ownership by the federal government in a merged big bank indirectly through an old stake. We do not need a German State Bank AG,” he told Reuters.

Read more …

Hearsay report.

Saudi Crown Prince Allegedly Stripped Of Some Authority (G.)

The heir to the Saudi throne has not attended a series of high-profile ministerial and diplomatic meetings in Saudi Arabia over the last fortnight and is alleged to have been stripped of some of his financial and economic authority, the Guardian has been told. The move to restrict, if only temporarily, the responsibilities of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman is understood to have been revealed to a group of senior ministers earlier last week by his father, King Salman. The king is said to have asked Bin Salman to be at this cabinet meeting, but he failed to attend.

While the move has not been declared publicly, the Guardian has been told that one of the king’s trusted advisers, Musaed al-Aiban, who was educated at Harvard and recently named as national security adviser, will informally oversee investment decisions on the king’s behalf. The Saudi embassy in Washington has declined multiple requests for comment since the Guardian approached it on Tuesday. The relationship between the king and his son has been under scrutiny since the murder of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, which was alleged to have been ordered by Prince Mohammed and provoked international condemnation of the crown prince. This has been denied by the Saudi government.

Experts on the Middle East are divided over whether the murder, and concern over the kingdom’s role in the conflict in Yemen, have led to tension at the heart of the notoriously secretive royal court. But while most observers expect Prince Mohammed to accede to the thrown, there are some signs that the king is seeking to rein in his controversial son at a time when Saudi Arabia is under the spotlight. The Guardian has been told Prince Mohammed did not attend two of the most recent weekly meetings of cabinet ministers, which are headed by the king. The crown prince has also not attended other high-profile talks with visiting dignitaries, including one last week with the Russian foreign minister, Sergey Lavrov.

Read more …

And this is just what we see, what washes up on beaches. “16 rice sacks. 4 banana plantation style bags and multiple shopping bags” in the whale’s stomach..”

Dead Whale Washed Up In Philippines Had 40kg Of Plastic Bags In Stomach (G.)

A young whale that washed up in the Philippines died from “gastric shock” after ingesting 40kg of plastic bags. Marine biologists and volunteers from the D’Bone Collector Museum in Davao City, in the Philippine island of Mindanao, were shocked to discover the brutal cause of death for the young curvier beaked whale, which washed ashore on Saturday. In a damning statement on their Facebook page, the museum said they uncovered “40 kilos of plastic bags, including 16 rice sacks. 4 banana plantation style bags and multiple shopping bags” in the whale’s stomach after conducting an autopsy. Images from the autopsy showed endless piles of rubbish being extracted from the inside of the animal, which was said to have died from “gastric shock” after ingesting all the plastic.

[..] The use of single-use plastic is rampant in south-east Asia. A 2017 report by Ocean Conservancy stated that China, Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam have been dumping more plastic into the ocean than the rest of the world combined. Marine biologist Darrell Blatchley, who also owns the D’Bone Collector Museum, said that in the 10 years they have examined dead whales and dolphins, 57 of them were found to have died due to accumulated rubbish and plastic in their stomachs.

Read more …

Home Forums Debt Rattle March 18 2019

This topic contains 18 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  Dr. D 1 month, 1 week ago.

Viewing 19 posts - 1 through 19 (of 19 total)
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  • #46062

    Albert Gleizes The football players 1912-13   • How Boeing, FAA Certified The Suspect 737 MAX Flight Control System (ST) • Boeing’s Doomed 737 Ma
    [See the full post at: Debt Rattle March 18 2019]

    #46063

    V. Arnold
    Participant

    The 737 Max massacre, with its subsequent corruption, should spell the end of Boeing as anything more than a second rate builder of aircraft.
    I quit flying after my last visit to the U.S.(2007). Flying has become the closest thing to hell on earth.
    The endemic corruption alone should give pause; but it doesn’t. And won’t.
    I thought Charles Alban’s piece yesterday was pretty spot on: But, where were we during that process of corrupt governance?
    I’ll stick with Pogo: “We have met the enemy and he is us.”
    If there is such a thing as personal responsibility; then we, every man jack one of us, is complicit in this travesty of a governed people, under an alleged democracy, being brought to tyranny…

    #46064

    V. Arnold
    Participant

    Albert Gleizes (never heard of him) The football players 1912-13; is an intriguing painting.
    I had to double check it wasn’t soccer.
    Nope, Usian style football.
    Huge amount of detail…

    #46065

    Given Boeing’s clout as one of the largest US military suppliers, let’s not get ahead of ourselves, but there’s no doubt they have a major problem. That PR only cannot solve.

    Boeing Tumbles On Grand Jury Subpoena Probing 737 MAX Development

    In the latest blow to both Boeing and the Federal Aviation Administration, the WSJ reported overnight that Federal prosecutors and Department of Transportation officials are scrutinizing the development of Boeing 737 MAX jetliners, inquiries described as “unusual” and which come amid probes of regulators’ safety approvals of the new plane.

    According to the WSJ, a “grand jury in Washington, D.C., issued a broad subpoena dated March 11 – a day after the Ethiopian Airlines crash a week ago – to at least one person involved in the 737 MAX’s development, seeking related documents, including correspondence, emails and other messages.” The subpoena, with a prosecutor from the Justice Department’s criminal division listed as a contact, sought documents to be handed over later this month.

    The news comes at a sensitive time for both the FAA, which was among the last regulators to ground the 737 Max following a broad global response (led by China) and for Boeing, whose stock has tumbled in the aftermath of the latest crash, and as the WSJ notes, “it is highly unusual for federal prosecutors to investigate details of regulatory approval of commercial aircraft designs, or to use a criminal probe to delve into dealings between the FAA and the largest aircraft manufacturer the agency oversees.”

    #46067

    V. Arnold
    Participant

    Raúl Ilargi Meijer
    …and as the WSJ notes, “it is highly unusual for federal prosecutors to investigate details of regulatory approval of commercial aircraft designs, or to use a criminal probe to delve into dealings between the FAA and the largest aircraft manufacturer the agency oversees.”

    Well, there you go…
    I have few to no, illusions about the “justice” system in the U.S.; corruption uber alas…
    As Ilhan Omar said: “It’s all about the Benjamins baby.”
    Or as said in the book Dune: The spice must flow…

    #46068

    Recap: Boeing has halted delivery of the 737Max planes, but production continues. They make 52 of them per month, and have to store those somewhere. At some point, a big problem.

    They have over 5,000 orders for the plane, at over $121 million -for the MAX8. That’s a total of $600 billion at risk. And if you follow the tweets I linked to at the very top, you see that corners were cut everywhere in the process, so a software update doesn’t seem to go anywhere.

    #46069

    V. Arnold
    Participant

    And if you follow the tweets I linked to at the very top, you see that corners were cut everywhere in the process, so a software update doesn’t seem to go anywhere.

    No, that’s a complete sham; trouble lurks and this could go nuclear; deep, deep forces at work here…
    But, not to get carried away; a very serious dilema not easily solved…

    #46070

    Local reports: Multiple shooters, multiple victims, at least one dead, in a tram in Utrecht, Holland.

    #46071

    V. Arnold
    Participant

    The Usians have unleashed a virus, of mass shootings, across the planet.
    Well done USA; murder capital of the planet…
    That’s me shooting from the hip; boy oh boy; what a fucked up mess we’ve made of things…

    #46072

    And just in case you were thinking you had a clue about what goes on, Bill Craddick sees a Link Between North Korean Embassy Break-In And Christchurch Attacks.

    There are a number of analogous facts shared by the attack on the North Korean embassy in Spain and the terror event in Christchurch which suggest that the same team was involved in both incidents. In both cases the perpetrators showed that they were well versed in “breach and clear” tactics against buildings filled with people. In both cases the buildings were cleared efficiently and quickly even though the goal of the North Korean incident was focused on intelligence gathering as opposed to mass murder.

    And globalintelhub claims New Zealand has long been the Five Eyes’ testing ground for, let’s call it unconventional warfare.

    Enjoy?!

    #46073

    Dr. D
    Participant

    “It now appears that America’s would-be emperor, Pilot-in–Chief Donald Trump, may have pressed the FAA to keep the 737 Max’s in the air.”

    …Except that he grounded them instead. If you don’t have news, just make s—t up! So what happens after he grounds them, exactly the way you said?

    “But doing so was not his business.”

    That’s right: he SHOULDN’T ground them, the way you just said a second ago that he should. …And it’s not like the Donald was waxing poetic on this: the guy generates the should-shouldn’t-shouldn’t-should entirely inside his own mind. Look: a plane went down, they looked into it immediately, as always. Like $700B and possibly a world-wide recession was at stake. A second plane went down and they grounded them. That’s the fact of what actually happened. Except for the FAA approvals back when, that sounds about right and normal. When somebody crashes a Chrysler, we don’t ground them all until we see a pattern of design flaw, so even despite this guy, aircraft problems are taken 100% faster and more seriously and don’t even wait for a pattern.

    “It is easy to assign all the blame to Mrs. May, the control freak who lost control.”

    I suggest she did not lose control at all, ham-fisting it all was intentional. And widely expected when you ask a die-hard pro-Europe to negotiate a Brexit that the people wanted (sort-of). When you ask your kids to clean their room and they do a job that’s barely an attempt, do we attribute it to their “lack of quality”? No, they’re fully capable of doing a stellar job and some calculus too. They can do the job perfectly well any time they want to. …They just don’t WANT to do what their employer – the British people – want done. So they cry and stall and kick their feet. Any excuse but the real one: she’s a traitor to democracy and her mandate, and is savaging the British people in spiteful revenge. But hey, that’s the system.

    “100,000 Children in UK ‘Could Become Undocumented’ Overnight After Brexit (G.)”

    This is all as much nonsense as the border: you just say, “Follow all existing laws until further notice.” Boom, done. But they don’t WANT it to be done, they don’t WANT it to go smoothly. They’ve had two years to move on this and get ¼ way through the 100,000 laws Europe dumped on them in a few short years, but they did exactly nothing. And you want me to believe that they actually INTENDED to help anything or anybody? Of course not. Think 100,000 children are at risk? Pass a law and give them instant/conditional/full/partial citizenship. Law: one and done. It’s totally, completely legal and possible to do so. The Queen can voice a personal edict and do so in seconds. They don’t WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAANT to do so. They WAAAAAAAAAANT a big mess and no withdrawal. Don’t know how much clearer it can be.

    P.S. if the children don’t have citizenship, (Papers, please!) does something happen? Do their lights go out? Is their food cut off? Do they vanish into dust? Does someone round them up into prison camps and shoot them? Nope. You pretty much say, “my papers are in limbo,” and the constable says, “Right! We’ll put it on hold but get back to us on date x.” Or not. Certainly not being a citizen and having no papers doesn’t bother anyone in America –you can even be a congressional advisor or voted into office — so why not adopt our plan? Are these guys, Ministers and Reporters for real? They act like kindergarteners who’ve never seen the law or paperwork before, believing whatever they feel like without looking into it, so long as that thing is bad and confirms their bias.

    “‘Pupil Poverty’ Pressure On School Cash (BBC)”

    Perhaps the problem is that everyone is poor because they’re over-taxed and their money has been stolen by 50 years of fraud?

    “Apartment Values Tipped To Plunge As Much As 50% In Some Sydney Areas (DM)”

    Yay! Finally prices people can afford! Why isn’t everybody happy?

    “Ultra Low Wage Growth The Intended Outcome Of Government Policies (Quiggin)”

    Always glad to see an article on this. Central banks worldwide “Stimulate” the “economy”; translation: banks, stock markets, and insiders, first-holders of money, but then tighten when “Inflation” rises. “Inflation” for them is defined as any moment wages rise, and it’s not like they’re shy about saying it. So by every definition, they stimulate any non-worker, and attack wage-earners relentlessly. But hey, since no one notices and everyone is fine with this constant attack on citizens, us, the poorest and most vulnerable, who am I to say? Maybe we should just wait until they’re so poor they can eat and clothe themselves only by school handouts to say anything, or not even then, asking banks to “stimulate” and “tighten” and “help” us more. MMT, that’s for me!

    “its subsequent corruption, should spell the end of Boeing as anything more than a second rate builder of aircraft.”

    You seen the latest fighter jets the U.S. has put out? They already are. And the U.S. has the worst airlines and airports in the world with not only the worst security, but the worst experience, that will irritate and irradiate and kill the most customers. They needed it to match our world’s worst rail service. Grumpy news for the day. Anybody done with it yet? Anybody want to stop playing and change it now?

    #46074

    V. Arnold
    Participant

    “its subsequent corruption, should spell the end of Boeing as anything more than a second rate builder of aircraft.”

    You seen the latest fighter jets the U.S. has put out? They already are. And the U.S. has the worst airlines and airports in the world with not only the worst security, but the worst experience, that will irritate and irradiate and kill the most customers. They needed it to match our world’s worst rail service. Grumpy news for the day. Anybody done with it yet? Anybody want to stop playing and change it now?

    It’s difficult to rectify perceptions against reality; if the U.S. ever actually goes to war (non-nuclear) against a serious adversary; they’ll get their asses kicked fielding inferior soldiers, with inferior equipment, against superior technology and soldiers with superior training, backed with superior equipment and technology.
    I could go on, but I think the point has been clearly made by most serious analysts, of this subject.
    The loud lout (US) is nothing more than a mad dog barking at the moon…

    #46075

    “God’s Own Country” was never anything but hubris. Whoever says that is no Christian. The need for the US economy, let alone empire, to produce waste just to keep itself afloat is a beautiful example of hubris.

    Hubris is a beautiful word. I wouldn’t know how to translate it into other languages.

    #46076

    V. Arnold
    Participant

    “God’s Own Country” was never anything but hubris. Whoever says that is no Christian. The need for the US economy, let alone empire, to produce waste just to keep itself afloat is a beautiful example of hubris.

    Hubris is a beautiful word. I wouldn’t know how to translate it into other languages.

    Unequivocal yes to all the above…

    #46077

    zerosum
    Participant

    If you are a lawyer, Does Brexit mean cash cow?

    —–
    I agree ….
    Central banks worldwide “Stimulate” the “economy”; translation: banks, stock markets, and insiders, first-holders of money, but then tighten when “Inflation” rises. “Inflation” for them is defined as any moment wages rise, and it’s not like they’re shy about saying it.

    ————-
    737Max planes …. “but production continues. They make 52 of them per month, and have to store those somewhere. At some point, a big problem.”

    Its everywhere, every mfg yards are full of overstock inventory. I don’t see a problem. The bankers don’t see a problem. Its even more assets.

    Fighting drones will be their profit items.

    #46078

    MoFlora
    Participant

    Here is an excellent follow-on to your Holmgren posting of the other day.

    http://www.lifeworth.com/deepadaptation.pdf

    #46079

    zerosum
    Participant

    @moflora
    Read the paper.

    There is hope with “relinquishment.”

    understandable Never discussed,

    Impact of “relinquishment.” of electricity and oil

    “relinquishment.”( increasing) vasectomy, and hysterectomy,

    #46081

    VisionHawk
    Participant

    We might want to rethink who was first in New Zealand…..

    1 The Waitaha People – a Chinese colony that settled in New Zealand 2000 years ago.

    #46091

    Dr. D
    Participant

    When you talk about Deep Time, everything changes, for there was no “China” then, or not equivalent to today’s people’s republic. Nor was there an “England”, as they were 5 kingdoms, no Germany, which was a system of states, nor so many, many other things.

    Just a thought as we often use words with an equivalency they don’t have.

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