Chris M

 
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  • in reply to: The Last Debt Rattle? #50884

    Chris M
    Participant

    “Reaction on witter”

    Good one. 😏

    in reply to: Debt Rattle August 9 2019 #49090

    Chris M
    Participant

    Ken,

    My broader point, which I think may be shared by Mr.Meijer, is that we will have to localize and use carbohydrates instead of hydrocarbons to power ourselves.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle August 9 2019 #49083

    Chris M
    Participant

    By Mr. Meijer the other day:

    “Cheap abundant energy is the worst thing that could happen to mankind and the planet.”

    I think it’s called the sun, no? 😏

    Benjamin Franklin said there were three ways for a nation (and an individual, for that matter) to become wealthy:

    1. Go to war against another nation and steal its wealth.

    2. Trade with another nation and gain the upper hand by cheating.

    3. Plant a seed and watch new wealth being created as if by a miracle.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle July 17 2019 #48624

    Chris M
    Participant

    That Lyme disease thing reminded me of something.

    As a farmer, I have often wondered how many of the plant viruses we now see had been engineered in weapons labs as a means to destroy or harm the enemy’s crops.

    I also remember that when some university and USDA plant pathologists were asked the question, they gave quite odd, defensive, and/or evasive answers.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle July 12 2019 #48509

    Chris M
    Participant

    “If they let him out on bail there’ll be riots.”

    Nah. Nothing beer, bread, drugs, circuses, and sophomoric tribalism won’t fix. 😏

    in reply to: Debt Rattle July 5 2019 #48393

    Chris M
    Participant

    Anticlimactic,

    After World War 1, the big banks in the United States who loaned money to the entities in Europe to fight the war clamored that they pay back their loans–they needed to pay back the US.

    The US wasn’t us. It was the bankers.

    Europe paid back their loans with agricultural goods that flooded our markets and led to the downturn in agriculture that helped lead to the Great Depression.

    The more things change, the more they stay the same, indeed.

    Nothing new under the sun.

    in reply to: War and Young Americans #47602

    Chris M
    Participant

    Unforgiven. The American Economic System Sold for War and Debt. By Charles Walters

    Unforgiven

    in reply to: Debt Rattle May 16 2019 #47408

    Chris M
    Participant

    Teachers that are mostly concerned about their power will teach in a way in order to keep their power.

    It may be wise to listen to those who could care less about their power.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle May 3 2019 #47112

    Chris M
    Participant

    Raul,

    I certainly wasn’t suggesting that was the only reason for them to bring in lawyers to do the questioning. I simply found it humorous, at first glance.

    Dark humor, perhaps.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle May 2 2019 #47091

    Chris M
    Participant

    “Still don’t get why they insist on lawyers asking their questions for them.’

    Lawmakers that don’t know the law.

    Dandy.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle March 26 2019 #46270

    Chris M
    Participant

    V. Arnold,

    It is said somewhere that my people perish for lack of knowledge.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle March 10 2019 #45904

    Chris M
    Participant

    Zerosum,

    People too. 😏

    Pull those weeds and put them in the compost pile. Those “weeds” draw out nutrients in the soil, that one may say, are “hard to get” in the locality where they are growing.

    Nature knows how to balance, if we care to observe. 😏

    in reply to: Debt Rattle March 6 2019 #45804

    Chris M
    Participant

    Raul,

    From your reply yesterday:

    “Chris, as Japan has shown very convincingly (and still does), the more you try to make people spend, the more frightened they get and do the opposite.”

    Why are the Japanese people afraid of spending? Is it because no one had told them how a solvent economy functions?

    in reply to: Debt Rattle March 5 2019 #45774

    Chris M
    Participant

    “Perhaps the biggest takeaway today is that China is failing to increase domestic demand, long predicted to be the country’s saving grace.”

    Well, they either need to pay the consumers more or those shadow banks better start pumping out consumer debt.

    It’s not that hard. 😏

    in reply to: Debt Rattle February 14 2019 #45396

    Chris M
    Participant

    How far away is a false flag?

    Maybe Maduro will gas his own people, huh? 😏

    in reply to: Debt Rattle February 11 2019 #45324

    Chris M
    Participant

    Stupidity is an issue, but more so is man’s sin problem and spiritual death. Nothing much will change unless that is solved for more people.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle January 14 2019 #44821

    Chris M
    Participant

    Remember. Fiat money is not earned. You labor and earn it for them.

    That’s why you are debt slaves.

    When the people are exasperated and ready, a leader will come.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle December 27 2018 #44574

    Chris M
    Participant

    Just make Putin czar and get it over with. 😏

    in reply to: Debt Rattle May 22 2018 #40766

    Chris M
    Participant

    Seychelles,

    It’s funny you mention the plasticene. Whenever we find a broken plastic part or a bottle in one of our farm fields, we remove it and joke that plastic doesn’t make good fertilizer.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle May 14 2018 #40633

    Chris M
    Participant

    V. Arnold,

    It’s a bitch trying to be the world reserve currency, isn’t it? Independence and sovereignty not allowed.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle May 3 2018 #40438

    Chris M
    Participant

    Oxymoron,

    Dilly, dilly.

    in reply to: Let The Trees Rest In The Forests #40371

    Chris M
    Participant

    Zerosum,

    It’s called a preemptive strike. It appears that my neighbor might be trying to kill me. I must destroy his weapons. If I kill him and his family in the process–oh well.

    in reply to: Live it Up and Love it Up #40324

    Chris M
    Participant

    It could be said that a revolution of the kind that Caitlin Johnstone alludes to is similar to a repentance, a turning away from what we innately know is evil and towards what is good and perfect.

    As participants in this blog, one of the greatest evils we discuss on a day to day basis is the evil of undervaluing people through our conduct of trade. Our money is based on the monetization of debt. It should be based on the monetization of people’s production, their talents being used to create and to also serve their fellow human beings. Until we honestly address this issue, we will continually be under the system of debt and bondage which keeps us from the freedom to fully be what we were meant to be, to be people that love our neighbors as ourselves.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle April 26 2018 #40283

    Chris M
    Participant

    I’ll post this again. It never gets old.

    Benjamin Franklin said there are three ways a nation could become wealthy: 1) By going to war and taking another nation’s wealth. 2) By trading with another nation and gaining the upper hand in the trade by cheating. Or 3) By planting a seed, whereby new wealth is created as if by a miracle.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle April 26 2018 #40282

    Chris M
    Participant

    “If your objective is to pump the wealth out of other countries into yours, how do you achieve that fighting a defensive war?”

    By George, I think you’ve got it. 😉

    in reply to: Debt Rattle April 20 2018 #40158

    Chris M
    Participant

    There’s a lot to unpack in the article about sorghum and China.

    China’s agriculture isn’t as industrialized as that in the United States. For some reason, the farmers in China were left behind versus the manufacturing industry.

    You also have to ask how much of China’s own agricultural production is for people food, instead of animal feed.

    Also, maybe China figured out that it is more economical to buy cheap US sorghum than to grow it themselves. That’s an indictment of our system whereby the commodity casino determines how much farmers are paid for their labor.

    There’s a true cost to food. Pay now, or pay later.

    God will not be mocked.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle April 15 2018 #40058

    Chris M
    Participant

    Zerosum,

    Well said.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle April 15 2018 #40043

    Chris M
    Participant

    Zerosum might like this:

    Being a bully is how empires die.

    in reply to: Trump Makes Xi Happy #39806

    Chris M
    Participant

    Dr. D,

    Well said. Great article.

    Here are other things to consider:

    When properly used, tariffs are NOT trade measures at all, but monetary adjustment measures. They can, and should be used to equalize differences in the purchasing power of our domestic money (U.S. dollars) with respect to any particular foreign money.

    And:

    “Free trade” cannot take place unless 1) by barter, where substance is exchanged for substance without force or inducement. This is what most people have in mind when they hear “free trade”: no party was coerced or induced to make an exchange.; or 2) between parties using the same money.

    And:

    You cannot cheapen your way to prosperity, as you cannot borrow your way.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle March 28 2018 #39653

    Chris M
    Participant

    “Again, he says it’s what his father and grandfather wanted. Perfect way to save face.”

    That’s important to Asians, isn’t it?

    in reply to: Debt Rattle March 18 2018 #39492

    Chris M
    Participant

    If the Church said we could do with the earth what we pleased, that was erroneous.

    I think the scripture reads that we should be stewards.

    There’s a difference.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle March 13 2018 #39396

    Chris M
    Participant

    And stay away from the VA, VA.

    Word on the street is that’s a sh**hole too.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle March 11 2018 #39364

    Chris M
    Participant

    I guess it’s as good a day as any to be sardonic.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle March 11 2018 #39363

    Chris M
    Participant

    Maybe the neo-cons don’t want a country such as Russia to gain the strength and the standing in the world to counter their BS.

    It couldn’t be that, could it?

    in reply to: Debt Rattle March 4 2018 #39238

    Chris M
    Participant

    Nassim,

    Good call. J.P. Morgan was one of those banks that lent a lot of money to Europe.

    The media at the time proclaimed how Europe needed to pay US back. What the media didn’t say was who the US was. The citizens thought that the US was the U.S., or them. The US was really the banks.

    Media being in the propaganda business surely isn’t anything new.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle March 4 2018 #39236

    Chris M
    Participant

    The article by James Rickards was a good read. Needless to say, currency manipulation and tariffs alone won’t bring about economic prosperity and stability.

    A balance between all sectors of the economy–raw material extractors, manufacturers, creditors, and consumers (mostly wage earners)–with an adequate supply of currency, and an economic border (proper trade measures, including tariffs) is what brings about that elusive prosperity and stability. All cylinders need to be functioning, or the economic “engine” won’t run as it should. You can’t simply pay attention to one while ignoring the others. We know that.

    It has been an interesting week, listening to all the “economic experts” spout on about tariffs. The discussion about the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act causing the Great Depression caught my eye. Pundits such as Mark Levin and Glenn Beck proclaimed such a “fact” from their pulpits.

    A little history lesson is in order. International bankers, including some in the United States, lent billions of dollars to European countries to fight World War I. One of the big ways Europe paid those loans back was to export goods to the United States, including food and manufactured products. That influx, or flooding, of imports hurt our farmers and industry. Herbert Hoover saw what was happening, and put a moratorium on the collection of war debts.

    Unfortunately, there was something Hoover missed. European countries had roughly $3.5 billion of credits in U.S. banks at that time. That credit was subject to draft. The U.S. couldn’t spare $3.5 billion worth of gold and still keep a legal gold reserve. When the gold was depleted, the U.S. banks had to reduce their deposits. The banks couldn’t do that without making collections from customers to whom the depositors’ money had been loaned. But their customers couldn’t raise the funds to pay. Therefore, the banks had to unload stocks and bonds which were held as security against the loans. Thus came the stock market crash in October, 1929.

    Now, where does Smoot-Hawley fit in? The Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act was signed by Hoover on June 17, 1930. Take note of that date. Yes, it came after the crash. The implementation of the act came as a response to conditions already in force that were contributing to the depression. The tariff act intended to help the economy, but it couldn’t stop the deflationary drop in prices caused by a lack of purchasing power, which resulted in a decline of imports and exports the world over.

    What Hoover and his economic advisors didn’t understand was that all cylinders in the “engine” needed to be running.

    Last thing, obvious to us all. War and debt don’t bring about economic prosperity and stability…and perhaps the most obvious thing of all…they don’t bring about peace.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle March 3 2018 #39231

    Chris M
    Participant

    You gotta love Clint Eastwood. That’s awesome!

    I love how he just keeps on chewing his lunch through all of it. Classic.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle March 1 2018 #39184

    Chris M
    Participant

    The U.S. economic system intended for the general welfare sold out for debt and war.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle February 26 2018 #39147

    Chris M
    Participant

    Nassim and Seychelles,

    Yup. Agitate. Rinse. Repeat.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle February 26 2018 #39126

    Chris M
    Participant

    Zerosum,

    You might argue that is a fringe benefit of stock buybacks.

    But…why are these companies so gung-ho about stock buybacks in the first place?

    As long as I’m asking questions, what was or is the goal of the Jews having their own country in the Middle East? What’s their over-arching objective? I have my own opinions, but would like to hear from our resident scholars.

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 155 total)