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 September 11, 2020  Posted by at 9:39 am Finance Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , ,


René Magritte The Art of Conversation 1963

 

‘We Quarantined The Healthy And Exposed The Sick’ (JTN)
One in 100 COVID19 Patients Suffer Punctured Lung (RT)
UK Extradition Hearing For Julian Assange Postponed Over COVID19 Concerns (R.)
US Hinders Spanish Probe Into CIA Ties To Firm That Spied On Assange (ElPais)
Trump: If Woodward Found My Covid19 Quotes Dangerous, Why Sit On Them? (RT)
Senate Democrats Block GOP Relief Bill (Hill)
Schiff’s Latest ‘Whistleblower’ Probed By House Intel, IG, Fired From DHS (ZH)
Sidney Powell On Weissmann/Mueller Special Counsel Destroying Evidence (CT)
DOJ Records Show Members Of Mueller Team Wiped Phones During Trump Probe (Fox)
Say Goodbye To Globalization, ‘The Age Of Disorder’ Is Coming – Deutsche (RT)
Trouble Mounts For The ECB And Christine Lagarde (NaYM)
Misery In Moria Is Europe’s Migration Policy (Howden)
Macron: ‘Turkey Is No Longer A Partner In East Mediterranean’ (RT)
The Plot Against Libya: An Obama-Biden-Clinton Criminal Conspiracy (Draitser)

 

 

Not good: Global new daily cases set a new record. India adds about a third of that.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Conspiracy or incompetence?

‘We Quarantined The Healthy And Exposed The Sick’ (JTN)

Citizens and public authorities fixated on society-wide lockdowns as a key measure to combat COVID-19 have failed to account for the devastating effects those measures can have on society as a whole, a Stanford professor of medicine says. Jay Bhattacharya, the director of Stanford’s Program on Medical Outcomes as well as the director of the school’s Center on the Demography and Economics of Health and Aging, said in an interview this week on the John Solomon Reports podcast that he found it “shocking” that, as countless countries earlier this year moved to shut down ahead of COVID-19, so many had forgotten to “think about both the cost and benefits” of such policies. “Country after country made the same decision with a couple of exceptions,” Bhattacharya said. “And I think that was a major problem.”

The professor said the global community largely abandoned the playbooks followed during earlier pandemics, instead “jump[ing] to a global lockdown.” Bhattacharya alluded to the policies in states such as New York and Pennsylvania that instructed nursing homes to accept COVID-19-positive patients, decisions which critics have claimed led to a significantly elevated death rate in nursing homes. “We essentially, in effect, exposed people who were at high risk in nursing homes, in assisted care facilities, elderly populations,” Bhattacharya said. “We essentially, in the early days of the epidemic, did the inverse of the right policy.” “We quarantined the healthy, and we exposed the sick,” he added.

The professor noted that the World Health Organization, early on in the pandemic, suggested that the death rate for the disease might be as high as 3.4%, significantly higher than that of seasonal influenza. Revised estimates have put that rate as low as 0.26%, though some studies have put it closer to 0.5%. Health institutions “were guided by models that were not based on actual data,” Bhattacharya said. “They were based on assumptions of worst cases.” He said such policy was a “worldwide phenomenon” and not limited to any one country. [..] “I can’t understand how so many people jumped to this mitigation strategy,” he added, “when there had been a playbook … to address the epidemic in ways that took into account both the cost and benefits of the policies.”

Read more …

There are 28 million cases and counting. That’s 280,000 punctured lungs.

One in 100 COVID19 Patients Suffer Punctured Lung (RT)

As many as one in every hundred patients hospitalized with Covid-19 suffer ‘punctured lung’ according to new research led by Cambridge University, further complicating treatment for those affected. Symptoms of a pneumothorax or ‘punctured lung’ include shortness of breath and sudden, stabbing chest pains that are exacerbated by taking deep breaths during the coughing fits associated with Covid-19. A punctured lung allows air to seep out and become trapped between the outside of the lung and the chest wall, eventually leading to the organ’s collapse under the accumulated pressure.

According to the new study, published in the European Respiratory Journal, tall young men or older patients with underlying lung disease were most at risk of suffering a punctured lung while undergoing treatment for severe Covid-19 infection (they are already considered at higher risk even before infection with the coronavirus). The Cambridge researchers behind the study used admissions data from the 16 hospitals and consulted colleagues across the UK who reported similar findings. “We started to see patients affected by a punctured lung, even among those who were not put on a ventilator,” says Professor Stefan Marciniak from the Cambridge Institute of Medical Research.

[..] even patients who would not fall into the aforementioned at-risk categories might suffer punctured lungs warned Marciniak, as many of the incidents of punctured lungs were diagnosed “by chance.” Almost two thirds of patients who suffered a punctured lung survived but the researchers recorded just a 42 percent survival rate for patients over 70. Men were three times more likely to suffer a punctured lung than women, possibly as a growing body of research indicates men are disproportionately affected by severe Covid-19 than women.

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Would they really mind if Julian gets infected?

UK Extradition Hearing For Julian Assange Postponed Over COVID19 Concerns (R.)

The London extradition hearing for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange was postponed on Thursday because of concern that one of the lawyers involved might have been exposed to COVID-19. Assange is fighting extradition to the United States where he is wanted for conspiring to hack government computers and violating an espionage law over the release of confidential cables by WikiLeaks in 2010-2011. Judge Vanessa Baraitser adjourned the case until Monday after being told one of the lawyers representing the United States might have been exposed to the virus. The lawyer was being tested on Thursday with the result due on Friday, she said. “At the moment we would respectfully submit we have to go ahead on the assumption that she has COVID,” Edward Fitzgerald, Assange’s lawyer told London’s Old Bailey court where the hearings are taking place.


“If that is the correct assumption … we shouldn’t really be here: COVID would be here in the courtroom and it’s not possible to tell how far it’s extended,” he added. The extradition hearings began for a week in February and were due to resume in May, but were then delayed until this week because of the coronavirus lockdown. Assange’s lawyers have argued he should be granted bail because he himself is at particular risk from COVID-19 as he has suffered from respiratory infections and has had heart problems. However, the judge has ordered him to be kept in jail because he is considered a flight risk, having skipped bail and fled to the Ecuadorean embassy in 2012 to avoid extradition to Sweden where he was wanted at the time to answer questions on alleged sex crimes. Those allegations have since been dropped.

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Investigating the CIA? Not done.

US Hinders Spanish Probe Into CIA Ties To Firm That Spied On Assange (ElPais)

There will be no judicial cooperation forthcoming from the United States unless a Spanish judge reveals his information sources in an investigation into alleged espionage against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange while he was living in the Ecuadorean embassy in London. Judge José de la Mata of Spain’s High Court (Audiencia Nacional) has sent a request for judicial cooperation to US authorities as part of his probe into a Spanish private security company named UC Global S.L. and its owner David Morales, on allegations that this firm secretly recorded Assange’s private meetings with lawyers, politicians, relatives and journalists at the embassy, where he took refuge in 2012 to avoid separate legal proceedings against him in Sweden.

Morales was arrested a year ago and released pending trial. According to testimony from several protected witnesses and former UC Global workers who gave evidence in connection with the case, Morales provided the CIA with recordings, video material and reports detailing the activities of the 49-year-old Australian cyber-activist inside the diplomatic mission, where he lived until his eviction in April 2019. Judge De la Mata, who is heading the probe into UC Global, has asked US prosecutors for the IP (Internet Protocol) addresses of the computers or other networked devices that allegedly connected from American soil to a server held by the private security firm at its headquarters in the southern Spanish city of Jerez de la Frontera.

That server stored all the recordings made by cameras at the embassy, where UC Global was in charge of security, as well as reports drafted by company employees detailing each visit that Assange received, images of the visitors’ passports, and photographs of their cellphones and electronic devices. According to testimony by several ex-workers as well as e-mails used as evidence in the investigation, US intelligence services allegedly had access to this central server. US prosecutors have now sent a letter to María de las Heras, a liaison judge for Spain in the US, asking her to convey their demands to De la Mata. These include showing proof that the requested IP addresses are “relevant and substantial to the investigation.”

The document requests further details about the Spanish probe, including the sources of information for most of the assertions made in the request for judicial cooperation. The Spanish judge has been asked to answer a long list of questions regarding every aspect of his investigation, including who he believes that Morales was providing information to, or whether the judge thinks Morales was working for a foreign information service or as an agent for a foreign power – or whether it was simply a case of bribery. US prosecutors have asked for all this information to be relayed before October 16, otherwise “we will assume that Spanish authorities are not interested” and the request will be shelved.

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Woodward knew Trump said what he did after having been briefed by O’Brien. Who’s not a scientist. And that Trump right after talked to Fauci et al, who didn’t agree with the assessment.

Trump: If Woodward Found My COVID19 Quotes Dangerous, Why Sit On Them? (RT)

Donald Trump is hitting back at Bob Woodward’s claims that he downplayed the deadliness of Covid-19, saying if the veteran reporter really felt his approach to the pandemic was “dangerous” he should have made it public sooner. “Bob Woodward had my quotes for many months. If he thought they were so bad or dangerous, why didn’t he immediately report them in an effort to save lives?” the president tweeted on Thursday. Audio from Woodward’s interview with Trump discussing the coronavirus was recorded in February. It has now been released just a few weeks before Woodward’s book ‘Rage’ goes on sale — and there are reportedly more tapes soon to drop. Trump questioned whether Woodward had an “obligation” to come forward if he really felt his thoughts on the virus were so bad. “Didn’t he have an obligation to do so? No, because he knew they were good and proper answers. Calm, no panic!” he tweeted.


In the released audio, the president admits Covid-19 is “deadly” and worse than the flu. He also says he will “always play it down” so he doesn’t create public panic. Weeks after the audio was recorded, Trump publicly compared Covid-19 to the common flu. He also made public comments suggesting that the virus would eventually just “go away.” At a Wednesday press conference, the president slammed Woodward’s book and audio as a “political hit job.” While Woodward’s work is being celebrated by Trump critics, parts of his book have been disputed by Dr. Anthony Fauci, who works on the White House coronavirus task force. Fauci claims he does “not recall” uttering several negative quotes about the president attributed to him in the book — and said Trump “didn’t really say anything different” about the pandemic in private than he did in public.

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Or the other way around, depending on your affiliation.

Senate Democrats Block GOP Relief Bill (Hill)

Senate Democrats blocked a GOP coronavirus bill on Thursday amid a deep stalemate over the next relief package. Senators voted 52-47 on the roughly $500 billion Republican bill, which marked the first coronavirus-related legislation the chamber has voted on since it passed a $484 billion package in April. The vote handed a symbolic victory to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), who spent weeks haggling with Republicans and the White House over the contours of the pared-down GOP bill as he sought to overcome deep divisions over the path forward. GOP leadership worked behind the scenes to lock down 51 votes, a U-turn from last month when McConnell predicted that up to 20 GOP senators wouldn’t vote for any additional legislation.

GOP Sen. Rand Paul (Ky.) was the only Republican to vote against the bill on Thursday. But it failed to get the 60 votes needed to overcome Thursday’s procedural hurdle as congressional Democratic leadership and the White House remain at a standoff over a fifth coronavirus package. The brinkmanship was on full display ahead of Thursday’s vote, with McConnell and Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) trading barbs on the Senate floor. [..] there’s no sign that congressional Democrats or the White House is willing to break the stalemate.

Mnuchin, Meadows, Schumer and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) remain far apart not only on the price tag but also on significant policy issues including unemployment insurance and more money for state and local governments. Republicans unveiled a $1.1 trillion bill in late July, and Mnuchin has suggested the White House could go as high as $1.5 trillion. But he’s also suggested this week that his focus is shifting to an end-of-the-month deadline to fund the government. There are no talks currently scheduled between the foursome.

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That record’s definitely broken.

Schiff’s Latest ‘Whistleblower’ Probed By House Intel, IG, Fired From DHS (ZH)

On Wednesday, Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) has unveiled a new whistleblower – former DHS intelligence official Brian Murphy, who claims that Trump administration officials at the White House and Department of Homeland Security suppressed intelligence reports that Russia is interfering in the 2020 election, and ‘altered intelligence’ related to comments made by President Trump. “We’ve received a whistleblower complaint alleging DHS suppressed intel reports on Russian election interference, altered intel to match false Trump claims and made false statements to Congress,” Schiff tweeted, adding “We will investigate.” Except, Schiff did investigate – his whistleblower – for allegedly ‘providing incomplete and potentially misleading information to Committee staff,’ according to the New York Times.


Not only that, Murphy was fired from his job as the head of DHS’s intelligence branch and reassigned after he compiled reports about protesters and journalists reporting on the Trump administration’s response to the riots in Portland, Oregon in July. “Brian Murphy, the acting under secretary for intelligence and analysis, was reassigned to a new position in the department after his office disseminated to the law enforcement community “open-source intelligence reports” containing Twitter posts of journalists, noting they had published leaked unclassified documents, according to an administration official familiar with the matter. It was not clear what Mr. Murphy’s new position would be.” -New York Times As a result of Murphy’s actions, acting DHS Secretary Chad Wolf asked the Inspector General to investigate.

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“Sullivan’s court appointed amicus response brief is due [today]..”

Sidney Powell On Weissmann/Mueller Special Counsel Destroying Evidence (CT)

Michael Flynn defense attorney Sidney Powell appears for an interview with Liz MacDonald to discuss the developments in the Flynn case (note: Sullivan’s court appointed amicus response brief is due tomorrow), and the background information recently highlighted. As you review this interview, retain the 30,000/ft perspective. Ms. Powell also discusses the Weissmann/Mueller special counsel erasing evidence by wiping phones and hiding evidence of their corrupt activity. Additionally, Liz Mac circles back to the 2017 FISA report by Rosemary Collyer to support the most recent 2019 opinion filed by the FISA court showing the NSA database search abuse is ongoing.

(1) We know to a demonstrable certainty the special counsel took apart the FBI investigative file of Washington Field Office Supervisory Special Agent Brian Dugan in order to protect their corrupt investigation and the collaborative effort of the Senate Intelligence Committee. And Durham/Aldenberg knows that we know. (2) We also know with a high degree of certainty the special counsel created a missing Woods File for the Carter Page application when the IG started sniffing around and announced his intent to review the four FISA applications. And Durham/Aldenberg knows that we have strong, very strong, evidence pointing in that direction. (3) And now today we discover the same special counsel team destroyed their iPhones in an effort to cover their tracks. These three events all happened within an almost identical time-frame. C‘mon man… this is not coincidental.

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“At least 27 phones used by the Mueller team were wiped before they could be checked for records.”

DOJ Records Show Members Of Mueller Team Wiped Phones During Trump Probe (Fox)

Newly released records from the Department of Justice show that the cell phones of multiple people on then-Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigative team were “wiped” for various reasons during the probe. The records show at least several dozen phones were wiped of information because of forgotten passcodes, irreparable screen damage, loss of the device, intentional deletion or other reasons — and came before the DOJ’s Office of Inspector General (OIG) could review the devices. The documents show that Mueller deputy Andrew Weissman “accidentally wiped” his phone twice after entering the wrong passcode too many times in March 2018. Lawyer James Quarles’ phone “wiped itself” without his intervention, the records say. The documents were released after a lawsuit from the conservative watchdog group Judicial Watch.


[..] The records indicate Attorney Greg Andres phone was also wiped due to a forgotten passcode. And they say the phones of both Mueller deputy Kyle Freeny and Rush Atkinson were wiped accidentally after they entered the wrong passcode too many times. The records say that a phone belonging to FBI lawyer Lisa Page – whose anti-Trump texts with FBI agent Peter Strzok were of interest to investigators — was restored to factory settings when the inspector general’s office received it. Other officials, whose names are redacted, claim to have unintentionally restored their phone to its factory settings, deleting all records of communication. Next to the name of one redacted person, the record says: “Phone was in airplane mode, no passcode provided, data unable to be recovered so had to be wiped.”

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“The analysts note that the Chinese economy will be closing the gap with the US and could finally outperform it by the end of the decade.”

But doesn’t China’s growth come from globalization?

Say Goodbye To Globalization, ‘The Age Of Disorder’ Is Coming – Deutsche (RT)

The four-decade era of globalization may be coming to an end, and we could be entering “The Age of Disorder,” which will reshape both economies and politics, Deutsche Bank analysts have said in a new research note. One of the key characteristics of the new era will be the reversal of unfettered globalization, a team of analysts led by strategist Jim Reid predicted. While we saw “the best combined asset price growth of any era in history, with equity and bond returns very strong across the board” since 1980, “the Age of Disorder” is likely to break this trend. Deteriorating US-China relations is another theme (out of eight) that will define the next distinct era of modern times, “which is hastened, but not caused by, the pandemic.” The analysts note that the Chinese economy will be closing the gap with the US and could finally outperform it by the end of the decade.

“A clash of cultures and interests therefore beckons, especially as China grows closer to being the largest economy in the world,” the report says. Fortunately, this economic standoff is unlikely to trigger a real military conflict between the two states, as usually happens when a rising power tries to challenge the ruling one. Economic war – with tariffs, sanctions, and attacks in the technology sphere – will go on instead, the analysts believe. No matter who wins the 2020 presidential election in the US, the rift between the two superpowers will grow. While the coronavirus crisis has already put the European economy at a crossroads, Deutsche Bank says that the next decade may become “a make-or-break decade for Europe.” Among other factors defining the future are higher debt and helicopter money (distributing cash to the public) becoming mainstream – policies which are likely to spike inflation.

Inequality may even get worse in the post-Covid-19 world, before a backlash and reversal takes place, the bank says. Inequality is closely connected with the intergenerational gap, but the analysts expect that the number of younger voters will exceed those born before 1980 by the end of the decade. This could lead to major policy changes in many spheres – from taxes to climate.

Read more …

Doctors and pharmacists always tend to play “hard to understand”. And so do central bankers.

Trouble Mounts For The ECB And Christine Lagarde (NaYM)

Today is ECB ( European Central Bank ) day where we get the results of their latest deliberations. We may get a minor move but essentially it is one for what we have come to call open mouth operations. This is more than a little awkward when the President has already established a reputation for putting her Hermes shod foot in her mouth. Who can forget this from March 12th? “Lagarde: We are not here to close spreads, there are other tools and other actors to deal with these issues.” If you are ever not sure of the date just take a look at a chart of the Italian government bond market as it is the time when the benchmark ten-year yield doubled. As many put it the ECB had gone from “Whatever it takes” to “Whatever.”

This issue has continued and these days President Lagarde reads from a script written for her which begs the issue of whether the questions from the press corps are known in advance? It also begs the issue of who is actually in charge? This is all very different from when prompted by an admiring Financial Time representative she was able to describe herself as a “wise owl” like her brooch. Whoever was in charge got her to change her tune substantially on CNBC later and got a correcting footnote in the minutes. “I am fully committed to avoid any fragmentation in a difficult moment for the euro area. High spreads due to the coronavirus impair the transmission of monetary policy. We will use the flexibility embedded in the asset purchase programme, including within the public sector purchase programme. The package approved today can be used flexibly to avoid dislocations in bond markets, and we are ready to use the necessary determination and strength.”

Next comes her promise to unify the ECB Governing Council and have it singing from the same hymn sheet, unlike the term of her predecessor Mario Draghi. This has been crumbling over the past day or two as we have received reports of better economic expectations from some ECB members. This has been solidified by this in Eurofi magazine today. “Now that we have moved past the impact phase of the shock, we can shift our attention toward the recovery phase. Recently, forward looking confidence indicators look robust, while high frequency data suggest that mobility is recovering. These developments solidify the confidence in our baseline projection with a more favorable balance-of-risks. However, even if no further setbacks materialize economic activity will only approach pre-corona levels at the end of 2022.”

That is from Klass Knot the head of the DNB or Netherlands central bank and any doubts about his view are further expunged below. “Relying too heavily on monetary policy to get the job done might have contributed to perceptions of a “central bank put” in the recovery from the euro area debt crisis, where the ECB bore all of the downside risk to the economy.” Might?!

Read more …

Sleeping by the side of the road with little children, while cars rush by. The local stores won’t sell them anything, including water.

Misery In Moria Is Europe’s Migration Policy (Howden)

Five years ago, when the refugee camp at Moria was still just a bad idea, a local army officer was asked to assess the site. Surveying the hillside of olive groves, Stavros Miroyiannis warned the authorities they were going to “build a favela.” If they had to choose this site, he said, they should at least plan the camp as they would a village. They ignored him on both counts. Miroyiannis would go on to put his own advice into practice a few kilometers away as the camp manager at Lesvos’ much smaller and more humane Kara Tepe camp. Meanwhile, Moria, which burned to the ground this week, came to resemble a detention camp and function like the slum he predicted. And yet, while the ashes of Moria are still smoldering, the one certainty is that it will be rebuilt.

Moria, in all its miserable, dehumanizing squalor, was designed to be that way. It was not a mistake. The camp was the product of political calculations in Brussels and European capitals and that calculus has not changed. It is fireproof. When thousands, and then tens of thousands, of asylum seekers began to arrive by sea on Greece’s islands in 2015, the European Union’s strategic response was the creation of so-called “hot spots.” Moria was the largest and most notorious of these, and its architecture and evolution most graphically demonstrated its true intention. Its concrete terraces, nested fences and razor wire amounted to an anti-shelter. It was not meant to receive and give shelter, it was a spectacle intended to deter future asylum seekers.

Moria became the emblem of an EU deterrence policy in which the warehousing of asylum seekers in humiliating circumstances was the point. Any other approach was and is seen as creating a “pull factor” that will attract another 2015-style surge of arrivals. Migration experts have spent the last five years explaining to policymakers why this is not true but the base assumption has proven to be impervious to evidence. The European deterrence consensus is concealed behind technocratic jargon like “managed migration” but it is really evidence that the Continent prefers to pay the poor to contain the poorest. Europe’s leaders no longer care whether human warehouse fees are paid to Turkey or to Greece, or spent on a lower cost per capita basis in Jordan or Lebanon. The deal that underpins the consensus was the EU-Turkey statement unveiled in 2016.

That agreement foresaw Turkey preventing the departure for Europe of the vast majority of asylum seekers in return for billions of euros in financial assistance. The terms transformed refugees and migrants into a commodity that could be leveraged by the unpredictable and autocratic regime of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan When the deal collapsed six months ago, it quickly became apparent that there were no new ideas on the EU side. All diplomatic efforts have dwelt on renegotiating the old deal with some minor tweaks. Meanwhile, the dreadful logic of its original terms has reached its inevitable, damaging conclusion: People trying to access asylum in Europe are cast not as “people like us” but an invading horde — weapons in an asymmetric war.

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“We must be tough with the Turkish government and not with the Turkish people who deserve more than the Erdogan government..”

Macron: ‘Turkey Is No Longer A Partner In East Mediterranean’ (RT)

The Turkish Foreign Ministry said on Thursday that the French president’s critical comments on the standoff in the eastern Mediterranean are a sign “of his own weakness and despair.” Macron “has again made an arrogant… statement,” the ministry in Ankara said after the French president urged European leaders earlier in the day to stand up to Turkey’s “unacceptable provocations.” He hosted an emergency summit in Corsica with seven leaders of EU countries that border the Mediterranean Sea at a time when Ankara seeks to expand its energy resources and influence in the eastern Mediterranean. The meeting came amid fears of an open conflict with Turkey stemming from tensions over offshore oil and gas drilling. Ankara has already lashed out at France and the EU for siding with Greece and Cyprus in the dispute.

Ahead of the Med-7 Summit, Macron said that “Turkey is no longer a partner in the Mediterranean region.” He made it clear that the meeting was summoned to clarify “red lines” if a “fruitful dialogue” with Turkey was to restart. The EU states should avoid an escalation, but that does not mean they should be passive in disputes with Ankara, Macron said. “We must be tough with the Turkish government and not with the Turkish people who deserve more than the Erdogan government,” the French leader was quoted as saying. “All unilateral actions of Turkey, such as the Turkish-Libyan memorandum, without respecting the rights of Greece, are unacceptable.”

Apart from the Foreign Ministry in Ankara, Turkey’s ruling party did not leave Macron’s comments unnoticed either, accusing him of extending his country’s “long history of colonialism.” Omer Celik, spokesman for the Justice and Development (AK) Party, described the French leader’s statement as an “old and immoral game” of colonialists. “They offered a false show of love to exploit the people, but targeted patriotic leaders,” he tweeted.

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“The cattle brands on their faces tell a story more tragic than anything produced by Hollywood. These are slaves: human beings bought and sold for their labor.”

The Plot Against Libya: An Obama-Biden-Clinton Criminal Conspiracy (Draitser)

The scorching desert sun streams through narrow slats in the tiny window. A mouse scurries across the cracked concrete floor, the scuttling of its tiny feet drowned out by the sound of distant voices speaking in Arabic. Their chatter is in a western Libyan dialect distinctive from the eastern dialect favored in Benghazi. Somewhere off in the distance, beyond the shimmering desert horizon, is Tripoli, the jewel of Africa now reduced to perpetual war. But here, in this cell in a dank old warehouse in Bani Walid, there are no smugglers, no rapists, no thieves or murderers. There are simply Africans captured by traffickers as they made their way from Nigeria, Cameroon, Chad, Eritrea, or other disparate parts of the continent seeking a life free of war and poverty, the rotten fruit of Anglo-American and European colonialism.

The cattle brands on their faces tell a story more tragic than anything produced by Hollywood. These are slaves: human beings bought and sold for their labor. Some are bound for construction sites while others for the fields. All face the certainty of forced servitude, a waking nightmare that has become their daily reality. This is Libya, the real Libya. The Libya that has been constructed from the ashes of the US-NATO war that deposed Muammar Gaddafi and the government of the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya. The Libya now fractured into warring factions, each backed by a variety of international actors whose interest in the country is anything but humanitarian. But this Libya was built not by Donald Trump and his gang of degenerate fascist ghouls.

No, it was the great humanitarian Barack Obama, along with Hillary Clinton, Joe Biden, Susan Rice, Samantha Power and their harmonious peace circle of liberal interventionists who wrought this devastation. With bright-eyed speeches about freedom and self-determination, the First Black President, along with his NATO comrades in France and Britain, unleashed the dogs of war on an African nation seen by much of the world as a paragon of economic and social development. But this is no mere journalistic exercise to document just one of the innumerable crimes carried out in the name of the American people. No, this is us, the antiwar left in the United States, peering through the cracks in the imperial artifice – crumbling as it is from internal rot and political decay – to shine a light through the gloom named Trump and directly into the heart of darkness. There are truths that must be made plain lest they be buried like so many bodies in the desert sand.

To understand the depth of criminality involved in the US-NATO war on Libya, we must unravel a complex story involving actors from both the US and Europe who quite literally conspired to bring about this war, while simultaneously exposing the unconstitutional, imperial presidency as embodied by Mr. Hope and Change himself. In doing so, a picture emerges that is strikingly at odds with the dominant narrative about good intentions and bad dictators. For although Gaddafi was presented as the villain par excellence in this story told by the Empire’s scribes in corporate media, it is in fact Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, Joe Biden, former French President Nicholas Sarkozy, French philosopher-cum-neocolonial adventurist Bernard Henri-Levy, and former UK Prime Minister David Cameron, who are the real malevolent forces. It was they, not Gaddafi, who waged a blatantly illegal war on false pretenses and for their own aggrandizement. It was they, not Gaddafi, who conspired to plunge Libya into chaos and civil war from which it is yet to emerge. It was they who beat the war drums while proclaiming peace on earth and good will to men.

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Home Forums Debt Rattle September 11 2020

This topic contains 22 replies, has 10 voices, and was last updated by  Rototillerman 2 weeks, 3 days ago.

Viewing 23 posts - 1 through 23 (of 23 total)
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  • #63128

    René Magritte The Art of Conversation 1963   • ‘We Quarantined The Healthy And Exposed The Sick’ (JTN) • One in 100 COVID19 Patients Suffer Punct
    [See the full post at: Debt Rattle September 11 2020]

    #63129

    V. Arnold
    Participant

    René Magritte The Art of Conversation 1963

    That Magritte is just awesome…that high art is dead and gone.
    Captures The Art of Conversation to the ninth degree, even in 1963….
    Such a sad loss…in the decades since…
    I’m mentoring a couple of Uni students in exactly this lost art…

    #63130

    phoenixvoice
    Participant

    Joel Fisher is incorrect. Trump wrote a book called “The America We Deserve” in 2000. I read it many years ago. In it, he was outlining platform for his own presidential bid. I read it because In was metamorposizing from conservatively liberal at the time. I don’t remember a lot of specifics, but I believe he was supporting some flavor of Medicare for All at the time.

    #63131

    teri
    Participant

    You are closing today’s post with that silly tweet about Trump? That thing has been trotted out by twitter users for a couple of years now, and has been debunked. Took me just a few minutes of fact-checking to find that dozens of articles have already been written about the false claims in that tweet.

    Trump did walk down a NY street a few days after 9/11 – that is for sure a real photo of him walking down the street outside the NYSE on 18 Sept, 2001. There is no proof he paid any workers to help with cleanup or searching for bodies; matter of fact, private citizens were barred from the Ground Zero area by Sept 15. Trump himself certainly never did any such “clean up” or “rescue” missions, and except for that one photo-op shown in the tweet, nobody ever saw Trump (or any of his supposed hired hands) anywhere near Ground Zero ever again. Last year on the anniversary of 9/11, Trump told the story a little differently, saying that he had gone to Ground Zero with “men who worked for me to try to help in any little way that we could.” That’s a little different than the claim that he hired hundreds of workers to help with search and rescue or clean-up efforts. Yeah, well, maybe those guys standing behind him in the photo worked for him. Who knows what he means by either the first or the second claim?

    He did not donate any of the personal money he promised to any 9/11 fund, although the Trump Foundation did donate other people’s money to one such fund. [The Trump Foundation has since been shut down because of gross illegalities in the use of its funds.]

    And just this morning we have this news: “The Trump administration has secretly siphoned nearly $4 million away from a program that tracks and treats FDNY firefighters and medics suffering from 9/11-related illnesses.”

    https://triblive.com/news/politics-election/report-trump-administration-has-secretly-withheld-millions-from-fdny-9-11-health-program/

    This Trump love fest you got going on has now reached the level of grossly stupid.

    #63132

    V. Arnold
    Participant

    This Trump love fest you got going on has now reached the level of grossly stupid.

    Damn Ilargi; you cannot win; damned if you do and damned if you don’t…
    …so, keep on keeping on… 😉

    #63133

    I have no Trump love fest going on teri, but I get it that people drowning in the hate fest may see it that way. That’s not my fault, though.

    As for the tweet, possible, I can’t check every bit of info in every day’s Debt Rattle. And as for the NDNY article, well, that fits the hate fest perfectly.

    #63134

    Mr. House
    Participant

    Only one president in the last 20 years got a love fest every day of his administration, and he wasn’t even that much better then the others. People still fail to see the media doesn’t present facts or intelligence. They only present narratives

    #63135

    teri
    Participant

    Ilargi, it’s that you never, ever cover any news that might criticize Trump – except to point out how unfair it all is. There has been no coverage of Trump’s destruction of the environment, deregulation of and further massive bank bailouts to the banks, cronies placed in charge of agencies, increased usage of drone bombings around the planet, horrible sanctions on Venezuela and Cuba, incredibly bad decisions repeatedly made vis a vis Covid, a furthering of the wealth divide which surged with his tax cut bill and his administration’s mishandling of Covid funds, the huge increase in nuclear weapons in the US, etc., etc.

    There are things that Trump deserves blame and castigation for, and the fact that the asshats in the Democratic party are useless and swimming in Russia/Trump conspiracy theories does not alter the reality of the actual bad policies that Trump has undertaken.

    I couldn’t stand Obama, and didn’t vote for him. I never voted for a Republican in my life either, but my tendency to vote for the left never led me to offer up some excuses for Obama’s wrongs by saying how ‘unfair the Republicans were’, or that he was ‘not doing anything that Bush didn’t do before him’, nor would I simply ignore what he was doing in an effort to pretend like it was all acceptable.

    Each president is responsible for his own choices. Some of Trump’s have been awful, but you simply won’t allow any of that kind of talk. It’s true I can’t stand Trump, but then, I despised Obama and his smooth lies and his death march around the globe, and I found Bush intolerable before that. I excuse none of them. I consider it correct and just to let each carry the burden of blame for his destructive choices, or to receive the accolades for what he did right. This isn’t a hate fest against Trump, it’s me asking for a righteous recounting instead of pretending that the guy is above reproach.

    #63136

    Ilargi, it’s that you never, ever cover any news that might criticize Trump..

    I’ve been saying for well over 4 years now that me quoting the MSM would not be a balance, that I instead AM the balance to their 24/7 storylines. Nothing to do with putting the guy beyond reproach, just reacting to those who on a daily basis condemn him beyond redemption to burn in purgatory forever.

    You mention a number of issues that look valid but mysteriously get very little traction in the MSM, who focus solely on Russia and treason with a sprinkle of Ukraine and Syria thrown in, aka the Democrat agenda. But have you seen how many pieces I’ve run on Assange? Every single one is a scathing criticism of Trump’s role in that, even those who don’t spell it out. And you know what? It’s not something even his more fervent critics ever talk about.

    That I wouldn’t allow “any of that kind of talk” is simply false. I never censor anyone here. Everyone can attest to that.

    What I personally find hard to imagine is that there are not more people, on whatever side, who read a very crappy obviously lying anon Atlantic story about Trump hating the military, or comments on a book that all come down to: he deliberately killed 200,000 Americans, and then still not say: that’s enough. If you don’t do that, then which part of what you call your opinion is actually yours?

    #63137

    Mr. House
    Participant

    Its true, he doesn’t censor anyone. Otherwise this would be nakedcapitalism

    #63138

    Not saying I never would. There are limits. But since I dislike the one-sidedness in ‘reporting’ about Trump as much as I do, why introduce that same kind of bias here?

    #63139

    But obviously that makes it ironic for me to be accused of being biased. Nobody’s perfect. Beauty’s not the only thing in the eye of the beholder, so is the truth.

    #63140

    “Punctured lung”. This may be a very poor choice of words, as “punctured” implies the necessity of an object to do the puncturing. Did their ribs break?
    On the TV show “House”, a pneumothorax emergency can be (dramatically) fixed with a large syringe inserted directly into the chest: a puncture that allows air back into a collapsed lung. There is no application of a ventilator, but the word “puncture” becomes relevant, at least. The disclaimer “even among those who were not put on a ventilator”, becomes disingenuous, however.

    #63141

    Mr. House
    Participant

    “Beauty’s not the only thing in the eye of the beholder, so is the truth.”

    Good line. Should be the name of a new blog

    #63142

    Mr. House
    Participant

    The logic that you don’t have negative stories of trump= you’re a supporter, is the same as when you tell people you aren’t voting period. That makes you a trump voter by default somehow.

    #63146

    Susmarie108
    Participant

    @teri:

    Grateful for your comments today. You point out AND make a case for the other side of the days stories – doing it with an authentic but heavy Heart. It makes what you have contributed valuable.

    “What I personally find hard to imagine is that there are not more people, on whatever side, who read a very crappy obviously lying anon Atlantic story about Trump hating the military, or comments on a book that all come down to: he deliberately killed 200,000 Americans, and then still not say: that’s enough. If you don’t do that, then which part of what you call your opinion is actually yours?”

    THAT’S ENOUGH! What are we using these words to defend? One-sidedness or the facts?

    Does the Atlantic story = Trump hates the military? No, that goes too far. Trump says many disrespectful and ugly things (we’ve all heard him) – and so the Atlantic story true as written or not, lines up with the character of the man we call our President. That part is true and not an opinion; why not point that out? If I say “that’s enough” to anon smear pieces will you say the same to Trump’s disrespectful and ugly smears? It would be one-sided to defend Trump as not hating the military while ignoring what he has said in the opposite direction (with emphasis on the last 4 years).

    Does the Woodward interview/tapes regarding Trumps early understanding of COVID = Trump killed 200,000. No, that goes too far. What we do know is that our President downplayed the severity of the crisis which gave many an unrealistic view of the risk ahead. Was he motivated to downplay the virus because he truly didn’t want to panic us or because he didn’t want to look bad and risk his reelection chances? Based on the President’s actions to date, most understand that he will keep his own personal interests in the forefront at all times. That part is true and not an opinion. So if I say “that’s enough” to Trump killing 200K will you say the same and call out Trump’s manipulation of the facts for his own gain at the expense of you and me? It would be one-sided to defend Trump for being cautious/not creating a panic without mentioning the dangerous impact of his inaccurate assessments of the disease.

    René Magritte The Art of Conversation 1963: A really good conversation will move you in a new direction while taking you to a whole new level – together.

    #63147

    Based on the President’s actions to date, most understand that he will keep his own personal interests in the forefront at all times. That part is true and not an opinion.

    Sorry, but yes it is. I could make a strong argument that he is not out for personal gain. Being president, and running for the job, has cost him a fortune. He’s not power hungry either like the Bidens and Clintons, or he would have jumped into DC decades before he did.

    Nothing has nothing to do with his assessments of the disease, because as y’all always said, he must listen to the science. And now that he did, he must be hung? He was told one set of facts in a security briefing, turned around and asked Fauci et all about it and they said: no way! Burn the witch if she don’t float!

    I say this while repeating, as I’ve done 100+ times, that a country of 320 million people should be able to find a better president than Trump. But the country has not. It has picked this one. Oh, but that was not the country, that was just the deplorables,..

    The people who want you to pick THEIR candidate instead of Trump also want you to ignore what the Office of the President of the USA stands for, or they would not do what they do. If Biden gets elected, which I seriously doubt, the disgrace to the Office will not magically disappear. It’s been done, and I don’t see how it can be regained, That has zero to do with how you feel about Trumo or any other candidate, it has todo with the stature of the Office.

    Me, I’m afraid it’s lost forever.

    #63148

    teri
    Participant

    Ilargi, please, I don’t think you have understood my point very well. Trump needs to be held to account for the wrong actions he has taken. That is all I am saying. You seem to want to suggest that I am saying he is always bad and all his actions are always bad. I have not ever accused him of, or bought into, the whole dumbass Russia investigation, and that Ukraine impeachment thing was downright silliness. There are a lot of other ridiculous things he’s been accused of, but I don’t need to make a long list of them all.

    But when I castigate him for the way he and his administration handled the virus (as I did with explicit examples in a comment I left yesterday), I believe that everything I mentioned is worthy of censure. This has nothing to do with Woodward’s book; it has to do with the actual steps the Trump administration has taken since January and February. I have been thinking about this on and off all afternoon while I worked. (Luckily, I work at home, so no-one sees me staring off into the distance doing nothing occasionally.)

    So, I’ll tell you what it is about. This is my personal Covid story. My Dad died in April. At the time, he was in the rehab center at a nursing home. He was only there out of dire medical necessity. We never intended either of our parents to be in a nursing home, but he had taken a horrible fall down a flight of steps where he broke his back and sustained multiple injuries to several organs. Thus, he needed the sort of medical and rehab care he could only get in a medical care facility with 24-hour nursing staff. He had been in this facility since Dec . By March, we were under lockdown orders and were not allowed to visit Dad any more. Sometimes the nurses would hold their personal cell phones close to Dad’s face so Mom could do a face-time sort of thing over the phone with him.

    Our governor could not get PPE supplies from the federal government. Trump/Kushner had picked their favored states and really hated Hogan – the one Republican governor who criticized Trump. Hogan ended up ordering some testing kits from S. Korea and had to have the state troopers and state National Guard meet the plane and hide the fucking supplies so the Feds wouldn’t confiscate them. But we also couldn’t get masks, robes, testing swabs, etc. The staff at Dad’s nursing home had no PPE in March, and were re-using the meager supplies they had in April. In Jan and Feb, Trump was selling supplies made by US manufacturers overseas. In March, he and his team of miscreants were hoarding supplies and sending out stuff to only Republican states – and even that stuff was shoddy and dry-rotted.

    By April, when Hogan placed his order with S Korea, Trump was telling the governors they were on their own, and specifically mocked Hogan a number of times in public, via tweets and at live press conferences. At Dad’s nursing home, 42 staff members and 57 patients eventually tested positive for Covid (after we got the test kits on our own to test them). One staff member and 16 patients died from provable Covid. A significant number of other patients died due to lack of nursing care – this was true at all the rehabs and nursing homes; the staff was overworked, there were no supplies, doctors were working at both the long-term care facilities and at local hospitals.

    On Dad’s last day, someone on the nursing staff (realizing the end was near) let my Mom sneak in for a half-hour visit. Somebody loaned her a mask, gloves and a robe. Dad died later, in the middle of the night, all alone and having not seen any of his 6 children for more than a month. (Mom has not contracted Covid so far herself, thank god.)

    Dad’s life did not have to end this way. This is personal to me. It is also a fact – a FACT – that the Trump/Kushner/Pence handling of supplies, equipment, testing and tracing, supply transit routing, PPE procurement, the whole nine yards, was grossly negligent, inexcusably slip-shod, and showed such preference for Trump’s favored states that no-one can excuse it. I don’t blame him for the pandemic. I blame him for only and exactly what I itemized here.

    And while I am at it, let me tell you what else I am thinking right now. My father was worth a million Donald Trumps. Dad was a world-renowned scientist who was once nominated for the Nobel prize in physics. He was inducted into the basketball hall of fame in his home state. He could milk a cow, ride a horse, and fix the damn tractor with baling twine and bubble gum. He never lied, never cheated, sang like a lark, taught us to play chess, had us all reading before we ever went to school, ingrained in us a thirst for knowledge, and led his large family with humor and love, love, love.

    Trump cost me my wonderful Dad. Fuck Trump. And that is all I want to say about that.

    #63149

    Huskynut
    Participant

    @teri – so sorry to hear about your experience with your Dad. Of course you’re (very reasonably) angry. Without wanting to defend trump, I just want to observe that virtually the entire world has made a complete clusterf*ck of handling Covid. All the errors you point out were taken not by him solely or exclusively – he’s president, not God. But OTOH, I empathise with what you must be feeling – I’ve had nothing like that happen to me this year, yet I’ve felt massively angry and wanting to hold someone/anywhere to account for the train-wreck that has played out. Sadly, I think it’s highly unlikely that anyone will ever be held accountable, and that making peace with that is an important part of the process.

    @ilargi – firstly a compliment.. i think you’re handling the Trump thing well. The deluge of stories in the MSM doesn’t need any more amplification, only the counterpoints highlighted. That doesn;t make you a Trump fan-boy.
    Re your comment above “There are 28 million cases and counting. That’s 280,000 punctured lungs.”
    Please go back and read the article more carefully – it says“As many as one in every hundred patients hospitalized with Covid-19 suffer ‘punctured lung’“. I don’t have a count of hospital admissions to hand, but impossible to believe there’s been 28 million admissions.

    #63150

    Susmarie108
    Participant

    @teri:

    Sad to hear about your dad. By your own description, he was an amazing man. You honor him by telling your story; thank you for sharing. LOVE to you and your family.

    #63151

    sumac.carol
    Participant

    So incredibly heartening to see the sharing and support, with no ego and pretentiousness, among the comments. Restores my faith in humanity.

    #63152

    sumac.carol
    Participant

    It must be so painful and embittering to helplessly watch a loved one suffer from the ugliness of political maneuvering.

    #63169

    Rototillerman
    Participant

    I don’t wish to take anything away from the rest of your story, Teri, but the story about Hogan ordering testing kits from South Korea and guarding them from the Feds seems to have been a PR stunt.

    https://www.salon.com/2020/05/09/larry-hogans-fake-resistance-his-purchase-of-korean-covid-19-tests-looks-like-a-pr-stunt_partner/

    The capability of the political species for self-aggrandizement seems nearly infinite.

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