Gravity

 
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  • in reply to: Debt Rattle September 11 2016 #30392

    Gravity
    Participant

    Logical-Temporal Treatise
    On Recursive Realism

    1. Time is the powerset of countable events
    [and not numbered events].
    2. The past is the first event.
    3. The past is the empty set full of tachyons.
    4. The future is the imaginary event.
    5. The future is the empty asset
    half full anti-tachyons and gravitons.
    6. The cause of time is relativistic mass.
    7. The cause of imaginary time is negative mass.
    8. Everything real does exist in a gravitational field [including itself].
    9. Nothing unreal can exist in said field.
    10. Everything unreal must exist in an electrodynamic field [or else].
    11. Nothing in Gravity is contingent.
    12. Belief in Gravity is always justifiably true.
    13. Knowledge of anything real only exists in a gravitational field.
    14. Life only has countable being as entropic gradient of said field.
    15. The fair value of life expressed as timelike geodesic
    is nontrivially nonzero.
    16. To be is to bend light.
    17. The mind is a body of gravimetric events
    containing the idea of the body’s mass.
    18. Gravity is a thinking thing.
    19. The will is gravitational potential [leveraged by, through]
    and for the understanding of said potential.
    20. Any geometry of hierarchy is a mode of Gravity.
    21. The past being empty integrates intent [recursively].
    22. Tone precedes time; resonance recedes reality.
    23. Gravity is our algorithm.

    in reply to: The EU Uses Every Crisis To Grab More Power #23811

    Gravity
    Participant

    Gravity is a thinking thing.


    Gravity
    Participant

    Gravity is an actual algorithm.

    in reply to: Was Greece Set Up To Fail? #22545

    Gravity
    Participant

    Gravity is an automatic algorithm.
    .

    in reply to: Debt Rattle June 26 2015 #21865

    Gravity
    Participant

    Gravity is an anxious algorithm.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle May 13 2015 #21051

    Gravity
    Participant

    Gravity is through an algorithm darkly.

    in reply to: There’s Trouble Brewing In Middle Earth #20339

    Gravity
    Participant

    Gravity is an arch-algorithm.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle April 1 2015 #20241

    Gravity
    Participant

    Gravity is not a recursive algorithm.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle March 31 2015 #20211

    Gravity
    Participant

    Gravity is a stereoscopic algorithm.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle March 26 2015 #20126

    Gravity
    Participant

    [redacted] is a [redacted] [redacted].

    in reply to: Short Term Gains And Long Term Disaster #20086

    Gravity
    Participant

    Gravity is like a box of chocolates.
    That’s all I’ve got to say about that.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle March 21 2015 #20012

    Gravity
    Participant

    The will is gravitational potential
    and for the understanding of said potential.

    Gravity is a growing algorithm.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle March 15 2015 #19864

    Gravity
    Participant

    Gravity is a reloaded algorithm.

    in reply to: Central Banks Are Crack Dealers and Faith Healers #19755

    Gravity
    Participant

    Gravity is a clean algorithm.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle March 9 2015 #19741

    Gravity
    Participant

    Gravity is a karmic algorithm.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle March 2 2015 #19568

    Gravity
    Participant

    Gravity is another algorithm.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle February 28 2015 #19536

    Gravity
    Participant

    Listen to me very carefully, I shall say this only once:
    Gravity is a recursive algorithm.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle February 23 2015 #19442

    Gravity
    Participant

    “…the Greek government also committed to working in close agreement with European partners and institutions…”
    My bad, I guess the ‘partners’ are not the same parties as the ‘institutions’, so by ‘partners’ Varoufakis must mean countries like Germany, most diplomatic.

    “If the Greek government issued a parallel digital currency, and forced banks and businesses to use it, this would boost the money supply in defiance of the policy of the European Central Bank, said Varoufakis.”

    If banks were compelled to accept digital scrip as legal tender and therefore use it as currency reserve, they would presumably be able to fractionate its deposits and issue euro credit proportionate to reserve requirements. So if deposited, 30 billion of this costless parallel currency could multiply to 300 billion euros if banks could find enough solvent parties to extend credit to.
    But how is this scheme better than directly counterfeiting german euros, which could be issued without interest and without having to rely on banks to extend credit? Can collateral assets denominated in euros reflate by the price support of a parallel currency, or would such scrip have to be exchanged for euros through the banking system first?

    Thats an ambitious list of proposals.
    “• Ensure that its fight against the humanitarian crisis has no negative fiscal effect.”

    This point seems difficult, even non-pecuniary social support programs like foodstamps consume funds to organise. But alleviating absolute poverty may produce fiscal and social multipliers.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle February 23 2015 #19433

    Gravity
    Participant

    @ gezelle,
    Yes, I suppose that explanation of the switch from ‘Troika’ to ‘institutions’ would make more sense, so that its only to delegitimise the troika by declaring them to be mere bureaucrats.
    But on the other hand, Varoufakis has also used ‘our partners’ to diplomatically denote those same institutions recently, which seemingly promotes them to being equals in an amiable partnership with Greece, which is not intended then.

    I’m also confused as to how a state-sponsored digital scrip may be fractionally banked?
    If the exchange were enforced at parity with the euro for some period, could banks be allowed to issue an equivalent credit in euros if they keep such a scrip as reserve? Supposedly there are ways to make a parallel currency work to lessen deflation, Greece should try it anyway, it could hardly make things any worse.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle February 23 2015 #19425

    Gravity
    Participant

    The greek government suddenly referring to the troika as ‘the institutions’ is dishonest, who do they think they’re fooling with this silly semantic misdirection? Surely the greek people are paying close enough attention to notice this change immediately. It only makes the greek government seem afraid to confront the electorate with the fact that they’re still submitting to this troika terror.
    Whatever else the negotiations may change, Syriza’s previous standpoint that they would not be dictated terms by the troika has been repudiated most awkwardly.

    And has the odious debt even been discussed? Of course the troika institutions will never acknowledge the concept of odious debt and usurous interest, the profitability of the banking cartels and IMF fully depend on enforcing it. Maybe a legal challenge of this debt could be made some other way if grexit does eventually happen.

    A parallel currency accepted as legal tender besides the euro may be necessary to buffer the worst of deflation if grexit doesn’t happen soon enough. Some form of scrip or digital coin could serve as means of payment, but greek banks would have to be compelled to accept this currency as monetary reserve in order to improve liquidity and credit issuance. But then the ECB might not allow this, unless such banks were first nationalised.
    As bad money drives out good money, people may tend to preferentially spend this new funny money, pay their taxes and bills with it but hide their precious euros, so euro velocity may then drop even further in response, requiring further issuance of new scrip and so on.
    The other problem with a digital coin, besides its transaction needing anonymity, is that it only has value because it takes significant effort to produce and securely encrypt, and is therefore scarce in exact proportion to computing power. The government may not be able to produce it quickly enough without weakening the encryption protocol to the point of easy replication, making it untrustworthy.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle February 20 2015 #19324

    Gravity
    Participant

    Reports are conflicting, surely Greece has not promised to renegotiate with the troika, including the IMF. To again accept talks with the troika would definitely be a ‘caving in’ of Syriza’s negotiating position, as they explicitly ran on an election promise not to.

    Greece could use the opportunity to finally declare the IMF to be a criminal organisation perpetrating serial genocide and to issue international arrest warrants for their directorate as well as dissolve all debts to them. Varoufakis said he doesn’t have a problem with the troika partners, but he should. The IMF especially is an affront to human dignity with such a high kill count in poor nations, those bastards have to be taken down sometime. Refusing to negotiate with this sick extortionist cartel has symbolic value for democratic resistance everywhere.

    The IMF mandated austerity program has predictably shortened greek life expectancy by years, cutting off basic healthcare, social programs and inducing poverty related stress and suicides to go off the scale, as it has done before in many countries. No government can ever be authorised to accept such loan terms if implementation lowers life expectancy with mathematical certainty, but the IMF deliberately misrepresents the human consequences of their imposed social cuts to trick governments into accepting their program.

    Syriza’s negotiations may concede to the point where they [fake] promise to reinstate much of the murderous austerity, but such conditions attached to more unrepayable loans cannot be seen to be dictated by the troika again, anything but that, it would alienate them from their electorate and precipitate more bloody IMF riots ahead of schedule.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle February 1 2015 #18809

    Gravity
    Participant

    Essentially, the monetary system is a volatile pyramid scheme requiring continuous increase of debt-based money to avoid self-liquidating collapse. This system used to work when credit was productively allocated, affording growth in GDP, but not anymore.
    None can borrow their way to growth if interest payments on debt continue to outweigh the marginal productivity of spending credit, in such a debt-saturation any additional debt cannot be serviced and will directly contract productivity instead of growing it.

    In the past 5 years Greece’s economy has contracted more than under a destructive military occupation, so genocidal austerity hasn’t paid off to make the country more solvent. Default has actually become more likely since the country has diminshed capacity to service its expanded debt. And much of this debt is totally odious.

    There’s a persistent idea that greeks, especially the rich, don’t pay enough taxes, that tax collection is not efficient enough to minimally fund government programs. Its at least evident that productive activities have been taxed more than unproductive ones.
    Syriza’s program does state that they intend to increase the upper income tax bracket to 75%, while property taxes have already outrageously increased to fund municipalities, which will only make the rich flee the country or hide their income and assets.
    Instead, a 30% flat tax on all forms of activity but not property may be more equitable, since the secondary function of taxation is to finance government programs but its primary function is to diminish activity, and if no economic rationality exists to distinguish the quality of productive or consumptive activity, all should be diminshed equally.

    Greece’s labor stimulus must focus on whatever productive activity its remaining social and industrial infrastructure is most uniquely suited to, excluding debt-fueled consumerism.
    Its still a sunny country, besides promoting tourism, massively expanding solar generation could lessen reliance on costly electricity imports, and modernising agricultural production, water availability permitting, could help to create food and jobs. Some of the unemployed youth could be stimulated to emigrate to wherever demand for labor is higher, but there’s insufficient demand for labor in most of europe.

    Growth cannot continue on its previous unsustainable trajectory, so therefore it can only continue in another direction entirely, financed by radical honesty instead of deception.
    Thus, a comprehensive financial reformation encompassing the entire international banking system is necessary.

    https://varoufakis.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/a-modest-proposal-for-resolving-the-eurozone-crisis-version-4-0-final1.pdf
    This program proposes mechanisms to finance greece’s sovereign debt less deceptively, but it fails to adress the financial hegemony of the banking system or the notion of odious debt.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle January 26 2015 #18681

    Gravity
    Participant

    The Syriza election seems hopeful, it should take a while for the EUstablishment to infiltrate and lead them astray, if they haven’t done so already. Otherwise the EU could attempt to stall debt negotiations indefinitely. Even without interference Syriza’s program might not be able to resurrect an economy so badly degraded.
    The greek debt must be absolved or it will be defaulted upon.

    I’m still stunned by the sudden death of the saudi king, who was most dear to us all. Despite former misgivings, our honourable western leaders assure me that this king was a civil reformer and great humanitarian. I also hear he was happily married to 24 wives simultaneously in a country where adultery is punishable by death.
    Even westminster abbey felt morally obliged to acknowledge the late kings exemplary christian charity, especially heroic when considering that churches are illegal in SA and converting to christianity is punishable by death;
    https://www.weeklystandard.com/blogs/westminster-abbey-flies-flag-half-mast-king-abdullah-saudi-arabia_824313.html

    Its somewhat surreal to see western politicians prostrate themselves before the house of saud, believing it appropriate to mourn the king, after being Charlie not two weeks ago in defense of free speech.
    But in SA, being Charlie is equivalent to insulting islam and punishable by death.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle January 22 2015 #18568

    Gravity
    Participant

    Je suis Gravity;

    -Time is the powerset of countable events.
    -The past is the first event.
    -The past is the empty set full of tachyons.
    -The future is the imaginary event.
    -The future is the empty asset
    half full anti-tachyons and gravitons.
    -The cause of time is relativistic mass.
    -The cause of imaginary time is negative mass.
    -Everything real does exist in a gravitational field [itself included].
    -Nothing unreal can exist in said field.
    -Everything unreal must exist in an electrodynamic field [or else].
    -Nothing in Gravity is contingent.
    -Belief in Gravity is always justifiably true.
    -Knowledge of anything real only exists in a gravitational field.
    -Life only has quantified dimension as entropic gradient of said field.
    -The fair value of life expressed as timelike geodesic is nontrivially nonzero.
    -The mind is a body of gravimetric elements
    yielding volition of temporal topology by sublimation of self-energy.
    -That the past is always empty as final function of quantum gravity
    indicates integral intent.

    -Gravity is our algorithm.

    in reply to: About That Interview #17799

    Gravity
    Participant

    The leaked emails reveal concerns about the movies profitability, speculating it would be a commercial flop. The production company stated that the hacking is likely to have been an inside job, requiring familiarity with the email accounts.
    Because this movie is now perceived as important, controversial and exclusive, with limited availability, instead of remaining obscure, its commercial success is ensured, maybe tripling box office returns because of this much-publicised hacking incident.

    Hence there exists a motive, and also exclusive means and opportunity, for Sony to have hacked themselves as a marketing ploy to sell this movie. The US gov. could have collaborated in the narrative for an easy opportunity to demonise NK, or to create another mandate for tyrannical cybersecurity legislation. This account seems more likely than an actual political cyber attack by NK.

    Gravity is the Supreme Ultimate algorithm.

    in reply to: Oil, Gold And Now Stocks? #17083

    Gravity
    Participant

    “How is this possible? ‘The sharp drop in oil prices will help boost consumer spending’? I don’t understand that: Dudley is talking about money that would otherwise also have been spent, only on gas. There is no additional money, so where’s the boost?”

    This remark by Dudley must involve the idea that money spent on gasoline produces low spending multipliers because it is effectively spent out of domestic circulation, whereas said money spent on other things produces higher multipliers because it remains in circulation at higher velocity, or produces credit multipliers if saved, but generally promoting higher productive employment when not spent on gas.
    The logic seems fallacious, but could be conditionally true, depending on where and how the gas money normally ends up. Do gasoline supply chain companies pay much in taxes or wages domestically? If so, much of said money would be spent right back into circulation anyway. But if not, there may be a pathway for said gas money to effectively escape domestic circulation in an unproductive fashion. This pathway would then supposedly be narrowed by a gasoline price plunge.

    The shale boom situation should derail the argument, providing that the employment and taxable income lost because of the booms sudden reversal would outweigh possible employment gains elsewhere by higher multipliers in discretionary spending.
    Do multipliers actually exist in reality, as functions of monetary velocity and viscosity?

    Gravity is the thrice-greatest algorithm.

    in reply to: A World Run On Broken Models #16454

    Gravity
    Participant

    Gravity is an unbreakable algorithm.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle Halloween 2014 #16264

    Gravity
    Participant

    Gravity is a headless algorithm.

    in reply to: 40% of Eurozone Banks Are In Bad Shape #16067

    Gravity
    Participant

    I’m in 40% good shape with no money in the bank, so that evens out.

    Gravity is a rehypothecated algorithm.

    in reply to: Wealth Inequality Is Not A Problem, It’s A Symptom #16007

    Gravity
    Participant

    Gravity is an equitable algorithm.

    in reply to: The Contractionary Vortex Of The Lumpen Proletariat #15750

    Gravity
    Participant

    Gravity is an aerosolized/airborne algorithm.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle Sep 29 2014: A Rare Sane European #15440

    Gravity
    Participant

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akrasia

    Gravity is a reciprocal algorithm.


    Gravity
    Participant

    Gravity is an affirmative algorithm.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle 9/11 2014: Shut Up George Soros #15098

    Gravity
    Participant

    The past is the empty set { } full of tachyons.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle Sep 2 2014: This Is As Big As We Will Get #14954

    Gravity
    Participant

    Indeed, some sufficient magnitude of clandestine geoengineering would render predictive climatology obsolete by introducing non-modelled variables which cannot be isolated by causal inferrence, wherefore the benefits of geoengineering cannot be adequately determined by climatological results.

    Gravity is another algorithm..


    Gravity
    Participant

    Good piece on epistemological synthesis.
    The people perish for lack of knowledge, especially self-knowledge. Through lifelong exposure to corporate media and education, the average person’s mind is forcibly filled with other people’s maliciously marketed ideas and ideologies, intended to shape their preferences completely without the persons awareness. Edward Bernays authored a book on that subject, ‘propaganda’ it was called.
    https://www.whale.to/b/bernays.pdf
    The oligarch controllers seemed pleased to be able to centrally condition people’s behavior so efficiently in the modern age of universal literacy, by using central control of the printing press as a weapon against reason, with myriad applications in the marketing of commercial and ideological products, principally by utilising Freud’s new insights into people’s powerful unconscious drives and how to predictably manipulate them, so as to have people consistently act against their own best interests.

    I’m beginning to suspect that rendering aid to those Yazidi people was a pure fiction to disguise the real reason for bombing IS targets near Erbil, in order to protect the US’ ’embassy’ mission there.
    The reports that hundreds of Yazidi’s were buried alive are probably fabricated as a convenient wartime-atrocity. It is by means of reporting fictional or exaggerated atrocities committed by an inhuman ‘enemy’ that war hysteria is traditionally fueled in domestic populations, and the humanitarian intervention to combat atrocity becomes an easy sell. Most of the ‘journalists’ doing those fictional reportings have such a warped epistemological basis, malformed by a lifetime of absorbing propaganda and half-truths, they cannot mentally or emotionally question dominant narratives supplied by trusted authorities, such as press agencies.
    Carroll Quigley’s ‘Tragedy and Hope’ povides some insight into the selective reporting of atrocities, fabricated or real, to deliberately promote wartime hysteria in WWI, and also on the use of press censorship to hide from the public the total futility of the military engagement, thus senselessly prolonging the war for lack of public feedback and resistance.
    https://www.carrollquigley.net/pdf/Tragedy_and_Hope.pdf

    We hear that mass graves have been uncovered where Yazidi women and children were buried alive by IS (and infants were buried alive in their incubators). However, as a method of execution, burying people alive must take 200 times longer than just shooting them. Such a tactic could be deliberately used to terrorise IS’ opponents, but then it would have to be publicly known that it happened in order to spread fear, yet the mass graves were apparently hidden, totally defeating the purpose of such an outlandish atrocity. Then there are numerous reports of beheadings and cruci-fictions perpertated by IS in Iraq and Syria, who can confirm the actual truth of such reports?
    The eyewitness reports concerning some atrocious events do seem too numerous and too well validated to make all such atrocities out as fiction, but mediawise repetition could be employed to make single incidents seem much more common.

    “It’s very difficult for the EU to squeeze Islamic State through sanctions because the group is selling oil in a global market through Turkey, and is doing so at a 75% discount of about $25 a barrel,”
    Hey, but trading with terrorist organisations is itself an act of terrorism under those anti-terror laws, rendering material support and all, so any (turkish) company caught trading with IS or facilitating IS’ trade in any way through the turkish market, can itself be prosecuted as a terrorist organisation. So can the US government for that matter, when giving IS support in Syria, which they publicly stated they did.
    And at those discount prices, IS-oil isn’t building a sound financial basis needed to maintain and maximise production of the fields they’re currently exploiting, so the production volume of their fields should decline very rapidly.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle Aug 11 2014: Oil, Chaos, Power and Arrogance #14565

    Gravity
    Participant

    Would A Citizen’s Income Be Better Than Our Benefits System? (Guardian)
    “rich and poor alike would receive the same basic income financed by the phasing out of virtually every tax relief and allowance.”

    Now that I’ve actually read the article, it seems this particular proposal for a citizen’s income could at least be useful for simplifying the tax structure, perhaps affording greater efficiency in fiscal policy without increasing tax burdens to finance it. People already on benefits wouldn’t recieve a higher income, but some economic groups would presumably profit from a citizen’s income if financed by the phasing out of unnecessary tax reliefs and allowances they didn’t recieve. Such a universal income, if financed by cancelling only unproductive tax reliefs and allowances, may then provide a correctly attuned spending stimulus into the economy, which may eventually increase employment more than the taxation to finance said citizens income destroyed employment initially.

    On another topic, the Mosul dam by now is fully rigged with explosives and ready to go. IS(IS) has control of this dam, and they will not abandon this vital strategic location, likely choosing to destroy it rather than lose control over it. Many IS fighters would perish downstream if the dam was deliberately destroyed, but being irrational fanatics and suicidal nihilists, they don’t understand or care. The destruction of said dam and subsequent release of its entire reservoir would likely wipe out the city of Mosul and cause additional casualties of maybe 100,000 people throughout the region due to calamitous after effects.
    IS’ position at the dam cannot be directly assaulted with kinetic action which might rupture the aging and brittle dam or trigger its explosive detonation, so US bombardment of IS ground targets too close to the dam’s location is out of the question. Special forces or elite combat units could try and take the dam, but its likely rigged for emergency suicide detonation by entrenced IS troops.

    In accordance with the laws of war, it may be prudent to evacuate the civilian population in the area if possible, and then use aerial delivery of a potent nerve agent to thoroughly gas all of the dam’s occupying IS troops before they destroy the dam out of desperation. Because of the catastrophic damage certain to be caused by the dams destruction, it could be justifiable (and maybe legal) to use nerve gas against IS to prevent this scenario, but only if its reasonably certain that the dam will otherwise inevitably be destroyed by IS, and that it can afterwards be successfully secured and held against IS attempts to retake it. A large and competent army would be needed to permanently safeguard the dam and surrounding areas. As the kurds alone won’t be enough, no matter how well armed, and Iraq itself does not have a competent army, maybe Turkey could be persuaded to invade Iraq to fight IS, they supposedly can mobilise an army large enough to retake and occupy the entire IS territory.
    Otherwise, one might as well begin planning evacuation, mitigation and relief efforts for massive flooding downstream of the dam, inundating much of Iraq, as it seems inevitable IS will choose to blow the Mosul dam at some point, especially when the US airstrikes or kurds get too close, or if IS entirely fails to take Baghdad during next weeks siege.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle Aug 11 2014: Oil, Chaos, Power and Arrogance #14556

    Gravity
    Participant

    A basic citizen’s income is not as bad an idea as it may seem, it depends on unsaturated aggregate demand whether any given level of such equally distributed income might have fortunate conflationary or disemploymentable effects or not.
    A normal wellfare income in developed countries is reasonably apportioned to afford the necessities of living; food, water, clothing, housing and heating costs (although usually this apportionment is not adequately adjusted to real cost of living increases), and one is generally eligible for such wellfare if one happens to become unemployed, which is only fair insofar as government policy is the principal cause of unemployment most everywhere, and therefore falling victim to cyclical or structural unemployment is not entirely the wellfare recipients fault on average. Even if it was all their own fault, it might be better to give the unemployed minimal means for subsistence rather than having them resort to crime to survive. Thus dictates the ethical program of regular wellfare.

    Regular ways of distributing wellfare by bureacratic allocation do not reach some portion of eligible disenfranchised people, some of whom are most needy but somehow never apply for wellfare although they are eligible. Therefore a standard citizens income, which is automatically distribted to every adult citizen and does not require individual bureacratic intervention to allocate, could reach more people more efficiently, although it would cost much more in taxation to finance than regular wellfare does, which would burden the economy unless it was spent back into circulation with proper multipliers.

    A millionare would then also recieve the identical citizens income, which they surely do not need as much, but they would presumably spend it back into the economy at least as efficiently as other income groups might, and higher income groups would have been overly burdened by the required taxation anyway, so they’d only be recieving some of their own taxed income back.

    A common mistake indeed is to assume that the state somehow has the capacity to allocate a standard citizens income to everyone without cost, without having to tax more, and one cannot expect to finance such permanent stimulus with deficits. But a standard citizens income may perchance work to stimulate the economy, if the economic activities such a citizens income would be spent on can yield much more production and employment in aggregate than whatever activities were taxed to finance it, but this may also lead into deeper pitfalls of macroeconomic planning, because taxation multipliers are becoming increasingly negative of late, and any citizens income at subsistence levels would require much more taxation.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle Aug 11 2014: Oil, Chaos, Power and Arrogance #14555

    Gravity
    Participant

    I must say I’m ever more impressed with the quality of articles posted here. Today’s debt rattle for instance was informative and timely, delivering essential info that was missing from my overview of Iraq’s situation. So, Iraq has actually lost half its oil revenue to the kurdish nation and the iraqi president is also a kurd, these facts do shed some polarised light on the political situation.

    But is PM Maliki staging some sort of coup or not? How can he refuse to resign his post if another PM has been duly appointed today, where’s his authority to challenge the presidents authority over him? Iraq hasn’t had much time to practice its new constitutional format of legitimate power shifts in government, but perhaps deep religious divides in the body politic simply outmatch the ability of any possible constitution to arrange political power shifts fairly and orderly.
    Maybe Iraq as a nation does have too many unbridgeable sectarian schisms to maintain a stable civil society outside of oppresive dictatorship, and should therefore be disassembled into separate coherent ethno-religious entities which may govern themselves without complications of interreligious strife. The oil should otherwise give them more than enough to fight about.

    Its becoming obvious how the US position in arming and supporting the kurds is directly antagonistic to Turkey’s political aims of containing kurdish ambitions in the region.
    A kurdish nation as a coherent ethno-cultural entity is emerging rapidly now, able to support itself politically and economically and having a motivated military somewhat able to defend its borders, and now access to the world’s sixth largest oil reserves?
    You might say emergent Kurdistan is now more of a nation than Iraq itself, which has mostly become a failed state with standards of living and life expectancy even lower than under Saddam.

    Malicious US intervention has also successfully destroyed civil society in Libya, which was relatively stable and prosperous under Gadaffi, but has now become another failed state in utter chaos. But I don’t understand how attacking Libya was some kind of resource seizing strategy for western hegemony, as its become more difficult and costly to exploit Libya’s resources than it was before. Maybe it was merely Gadaffi’s plan to trade oil in non-dollars that triggered his US/NATO supported overthrow?

    in reply to: US Picks Wrong Friends, Wrong Enemies, Wrong Fights #14533

    Gravity
    Participant

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-08-10/coup-iraq-prime-minister-maliki-refuses-step-down-orders-security-forces-alert
    And now a (military) coup against the presidency is in progress in Iraq. PM Maliki accuses president Masoum of constitutional violation, further crisis and chaos seems inevitable while IS still surrounds Baghdad.

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