olo530

 
   Posted by at  Comments Off on olo530

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 40 posts - 41 through 80 (of 99 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • in reply to: Debt Rattle January 9 2018 #38161

    olo530
    Participant

    I wonder what would happen if the Russians were to supply the Taliban in Afghanistan with similar gadgets or anti-aircraft weapons?

    The irony is that Russians don’t need to supply the Taliban with anything, high tech or low tech. The Taliban is doing just fine on their own.
    I’m actually impressed that Russians managed to land some of the drones. It takes more skill to hijack a drone than to “simply” shoot it down. Koodos!

    in reply to: Debt Rattle January 9 2018 #38157

    olo530
    Participant

    Will South Korea now become enemy # 1 for buying Iranian oil?

    No more than France that owns the other half of Hanwha Total Co. US grip on power is slipping, vassals are misbehaving 🙂

    in reply to: Debt Rattle January 9 2018 #38156

    olo530
    Participant

    I was against that war

    THAT war, V. Arnold? From what you sound like you are against any war 🙂

    in reply to: Debt Rattle January 8 2018 #38140

    olo530
    Participant

    The moment I turned off my Magic Global DEW Dissipator for maintenance the evil Anglo-Zionist empire mercilessly torches an old car park in Liverpool using a secret DEW! What a coincidence! Or was it..?

    in reply to: Debt Rattle January 6 2018 #38138

    olo530
    Participant

    Remember: we are the ones making big tech bigger by using their products. We don’t have to.

    We also don’t have to use flush toilets 🙂

    in reply to: Debt Rattle January 3 2018 #38060

    olo530
    Participant

    I see dead people

    You and me both, brother… The only hope is we’ll die of old age before the shit hits the fan.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle January 3 2018 #38056

    olo530
    Participant

    Your monthly payments are two hours and forty five minutes late, but still coming through, in full, is that correct, V. Arnold? Is it a problem in and by itself, or you are concerned that it’s a sign of things to come?

    in reply to: Debt Rattle January 2 2017 #38038

    olo530
    Participant

    I don’t know enough about the Atlantic coast to speak with any sort of confidence, but wasn’t widespread ongoing conflict between tribes one of the reasons they couldn’t mount any coherent resistance to the European invaders? I vaguely remember reading something like that.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle January 2 2017 #38036

    olo530
    Participant

    I apologize, I read too much into what you said. In the literal sense hunters-gatherers are not self destructive and while war and slavery are pretty self loathing in my opinion, you didn’t say that. Usually people praising hunters-gatherers subscribe to the noble savage myth, hence I responded to that. My bad.
    Going back to your original statement, I don’t know if I would agree that invention of agriculture (and that’s what we gave up our foraging lifestyle for) was the tipping point. Then why not the control of fire? Or why not thermal food processing?

    in reply to: Debt Rattle January 2 2017 #38034

    olo530
    Participant

    V. Arnold, this Wikipedia article does a good job explaining what I meant – https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Before_Civilization. Come on, they even had slavery on Vancouver island. And that’s before any Europeans showed up. Being a hunter-gatherer doesn’t make you a paragon of virtue.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle January 2 2017 #38032

    olo530
    Participant

    We’ve become a self destructive, self loathing species since we gave up our hunter/gatherer lifestyle

    V. Arnold, in our defense, it seemed like a good idea at the time 🙂
    And besides, war was invented before agriculture. The Pacific Northwest Coast is probably the best place to live by foraging, all the indigenous people are hunters-gatherers, AFAIK, yet they warred all the time. Agriculture is a military technology at its root.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle December 27 2017 #37963

    olo530
    Participant

    Dr. D, I wouldn’t call gold “an almost completely useless rock”. In 2016 more than 320 metric tons of gold were used industrially. Maybe not that much out of 3,100 metric tons mined that year, but far from useless. Here is the percentage of mine production of gold used in technology :
    2016 – 10%
    2015 – 10%
    2014 – 11%
    2013 – 12%
    2012 – 13%
    2011 – 15%
    2010 – 17%
    That provides a solid floor for gold prices. Bitcoin, on the other hand – pure speculation.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle December 20 2017 #37818

    olo530
    Participant

    is there no-one capable of cleaning

    It works differently on the scale of 6000 people, anticlimactic. On that level you need some degree of organization, and I suspect all the efforts to self-organize are being actively suppressed. The refugees went through war, so their threshold for violence is lower, they don’t partake in the social contract, and their values are mostly traditional (contrasting with liberal). Organize 6000 people like that and you can run the island.
    Or maybe it’s a social experiment to see how refugees can overtake Europe. There are speculations that European elites are shipping for a new population 🙂 Would make sense to try it on a small scale first.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle December 18 2017 #37779

    olo530
    Participant

    but it was the USSR that liberated the Poles from the Nazis – and at great cost

    Well, maybe not so altruistically 🙂 Let’s not forget about that whole Warsaw uprising debacle. As you said, a lot of bad things happened.
    Also, that’s an interesting map. Funny how Armenia is dark gray. Should be a shade lighter yellow than the rest of orthodox countries, if you ask me 🙂

    in reply to: Debt Rattle December 18 2017 #37776

    olo530
    Participant

    Dr. D, it’s unlikely that predominantly Catholic Poland will join predominantly Orthodox Russia, even if the latter is restyled as Eurasia. Too much bad blood between the two. And Hitler (EU is his vision of Europe, give or take) didn’t particularly want them either, seeing them for the bunch of troublemakers they are. Looking how the Molotov-Ribbentrop pact was negotiated – it’s hilarious. Nothing changed 80 years later.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle December 16 2017 #37774

    olo530
    Participant

    These Russian skiers seem to be ok with plain white uniforms 🙂

    in reply to: Debt Rattle December 10 2017 #37662

    olo530
    Participant

    The fact that ancient Egypt endured for 10 000 years, and ancient China and India similarly

    Charles Alban, Egypt was unified around 3,000 BC and fell into decline around 1,000 BC. What 10,000 years? Even those 2,000 years were not continues, the kingdom fell apart a few times. If you mean that people lived there since forever and tend to live under a central ruler for long periods of time – well, that’s just a function of geography 🙂

    in reply to: Debt Rattle December 4 2017 #37464

    olo530
    Participant

    How is Bitcoin used for money laundering? You need a bank account to buy Bitcoin, by which time the money has already been laundered.

    You can buy Bitcoin with cash if you know where to ask. Once you sell Bitcoin it becomes investment income.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle November 29 2017 #37365

    olo530
    Participant

    Yeah, it was silly journalism to compare electricity consumption of Bitcoin mining to that of Nigeria. Still, some useful information. 77 kWh per transaction at 30 $/MWh (don’t really know wholesale prices in China) – 2.31 USD per transaction. Way cheaper than wire transfer, but probably higher than a typical credit card transaction. I would say comparable to reaching consensus through central authority.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle November 29 2017 #37362

    olo530
    Participant

    What did they learn about being in debt that I did not?

    Good one.
    A Canadian told me once that he doesn’t like math because there is only one correct answer. Feels oppressive 🙂

    in reply to: Debt Rattle November 28 2017 #37344

    olo530
    Participant

    He’d need to control 51% of all outstanding BTC

    You need 51% of mining power (25% in some scenarios) to double spend to your heart’s content. If you can interfere with message exchange between nodes then it’s even less.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle November 28 2017 #37341

    olo530
    Participant

    There are remedies in the works for the growing electricity consumption by “mining” operations… It isn’t an insurmountable concern.

    I don’t see it happening, since the main branch is selected based on mining power (or number of nodes, which is the same thing). Energy cost is the only thing keeping distributed ledgers from getting hijacked by malicious participants.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle November 28 2017 #37339

    olo530
    Participant

    Diogenes Shrugged, what makes you think that distributed ledger technology cannot be used to keep track of debt? What does it matter if you owe your bank 10,000 dollars or 1 bitcoin, whether the transaction is in bank’s books or in some distributed ledger?
    And that claim that bitcoin can’t be confiscated… Well… It’s only as true as that gold can’t be confiscated – if you hide it well enough. You have records of your private keys and once those are discovered – your bitcoin is gone.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle November 28 2017 #37337

    olo530
    Participant

    In the past year, bitcoins have generated transaction fees of nearly $219 million. And at $9,600 a piece, the total value of all bitcoins – their market cap – now tops $155 billion. That gives bitcoins the equivalent of a trailing P/E ratio of 708.

    Since when commodity trading fees are counted under earnings? WTF?

    in reply to: Debt Rattle Thanksgiving 2017 #37232

    olo530
    Participant

    The Saker is very knowledgeable, but his analysis is always coloured by his bias. He would rather believe in magic direct energy beams than incompetence. Looking at how often the US Navi runs into civilian ships I think incompetence is more plausible.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle Thanksgiving 2017 #37223

    olo530
    Participant

    V. Arnold, what makes you think that Syria has enough S-400’s to cover its entire territory? Remember that 59 Tomahawk missile strike on Shayrat airbase? 23 hit the target, 36 got lost and nobody claimed that Syrians intercepted them. It looks like Russians are there for a military exercise – how else do you explain launching ballistic missiles from the Caspian Sea to hit some ISIS Toyota Landcruisers? Fair enough, you want to get better at something – you need to practice. So Americans gave them something a little more challenging than pickup trucks to practice with. Turns out Tomahawks are ridiculously unreliable, but Russians still can’t intercept them. There is no shame in going against the best and losing, but you make it sound like it’s a done deal that Russia can close Syrian airspace. Last time they couldn’t protect an airbase. How are they going to protect bridges, tunnels, ports, power plants, factories?

    in reply to: Debt Rattle November 22 2017 #37199

    olo530
    Participant

    Can’t find any good English translation… This is barely better than Google Translate service:
    But whilst our globe, sirs, seeks in vain
    The path of happiness to gain,
    Honor the madmen who can trace
    Gay dreams, to please the human race.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle November 22 2017 #37196

    olo530
    Participant

    Messieurs, lorsqu’en vain notre sphère
    Du bonheur cherche le chemin,
    Honneur au fou qui ferait faire
    Un rêve heureux au genre humain!

    Pierre-Jean de Béranger, Les Fous

    Maybe prescription opioids are not all bad.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle November 10 2017 #36958

    olo530
    Participant

    It was wise, Dr. D, to stop short of offering a solution:
    https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/18/2385
    Up to 20 years in jail 🙂

    in reply to: Nobody Called Anyone An Ignorant Slut #36780

    olo530
    Participant

    Last year in St. Petersburg the average wage was 15,000 Rubles per month.

    I doubt it, V. Arnold. This August the average wage 37,140 roubles. That’s for the whole country. One of the largest cities is probably above average.
    https://www.gks.ru/free_doc/new_site/m-sotrudn/eng_site/Key_Figures.pdf

    in reply to: Debt Rattle October 26 2017 #36720

    olo530
    Participant

    Nabiullina sure is great. You don’t get “Central Banker of the Year” title for nothing. From the Financial Times – a big proponent of globalization. And then she won “Central Bank Governor of the Year”, of course. If Lord Rothermere himself thinks she’s good who would dare to disagree. Russians are so lucky!

    in reply to: Debt Rattle October 26 2017 #36697

    olo530
    Participant

    total US government debts at more than $200 trillion

    So what? Who is going to send debt collectors to the US government?
    “You may have all the money, Raymond, but I have all the men with guns.” Frank Underwood, House of Cards

    in reply to: Debt Rattle October 6 2017 #36337

    olo530
    Participant

    The banks ignore bitcoin not because of lack of regulations (they have no problem circumventing or breaking any regulations) but because the technology is not mature yet. Look at the maximum transaction throughput of blockchain – about 10 tx/sec. That’s the global limit. Sure, you can increase block size, go off-chain, and explore any number of other technical fixes, and once it’s done and stable and risks can be measured (and passed on to third parties) – banks will be all over bitcoin, or whatever it will be called then.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle October 4 2017 #36321

    olo530
    Participant

    That’s very optimistic. See how reindeer fared on St. Matthew island.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle October 4 2017 #36303

    olo530
    Participant

    Fewer people living a simpler lifestyle is the only possible long-term solution.

    seychelles, do you mean it like “it will happen” or “wouldn’t it be nice”?

    in reply to: Debt Rattle September 30 2017 #36269

    olo530
    Participant

    After the removal of Soviet central planning (and neoliberal colonial extraction), Russia has rocketed forward such that they’ve leapfrogged the US in military technology, and is arguably better off than several EU and NATO countries.

    “When researchers asked the public if they would like the Soviet Union to be restored, 58 percent replied in the affirmative, with 14 percent saying they considered such project quite realistic at the moment. Forty-four percent view the restoration of the USSR as unfeasible, even though preferable.”
    https://www.rt.com/politics/340158-most-russians-regret-ussr-has/
    Sorry, Dr. Diablo, Russians seem to disagree 🙂

    in reply to: Debt Rattle September 27 2017 #36150

    olo530
    Participant

    ..if the Jones Act did not exist, then neither would the public debt of Puerto Rico.

    And if grandma had balls… The Jones Act is a modern version of the Tea Act. Oh, the irony…

    in reply to: Debt Rattle September 21 2017 #36048

    olo530
    Participant

    Puerto Rico has decent power generation, and I bet it’s mostly intact. Their power transmission got hit, but that’s not difficult to restore, it just takes long to restore it everywhere. So San Juan will get power back probably by the end of next week, and some remote villages might get it back in 6 months. It’s not like they were heavily relying on electricity anyways – it always sucked.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle September 20 2017 #36027

    olo530
    Participant

    Thank you, Dr. Diablo. Your comment is more informative than all the other Bitcoin news on this blog combined.

    in reply to: The Only Real Europe is Greece #35938

    olo530
    Participant

    Are Greeks worried about possible deflation of their housing market? It seems if I have low income compared to how much it costs to buy a place and then that ratio suddenly changes in my favour I should be pretty happy. What am I missing?

Viewing 40 posts - 41 through 80 (of 99 total)