tony smyth

 
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  • in reply to: Debt Rattle March 9 2019 #45880

    tony smyth
    Participant

    Greenpeace co-founder Patrick Moore: interview on Breibart News. that says it all.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle February 28 2019 #45628

    tony smyth
    Participant

    “While growth may moderate between now and election day, few economists expect a recession anytime soon”. Woooooo
    How deluded can you get?

    in reply to: Debt Rattle September 9 2018 #42798

    tony smyth
    Participant

    Jonathan Richmond. Havent heard that in ages. Has a nice Velvet Underground amateurishness about it. I think Bowie did a version but knocked all the edges and charm off it.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle July 18 2018 #41870

    tony smyth
    Participant

    Have to laugh at that deluded best “growth-oriented tax programs in Europe”. Ireland, The Netherlands and Luxemburg: they just happen to be the three biggest tax HAVENS in Europe!!

    in reply to: Debt Rattle June 20 2018 #41307

    tony smyth
    Participant

    Not only good taste in art but also in reggae!! Linton Kwesi Johnson. Nice one.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle June 15 2018 #41200

    tony smyth
    Participant

    My favourite journalist these days is Nafeez Ahmed, but I’m finding Caitlin Johnstone’s writing increasingly excellent. Another great article here.
    Trump is without any doubt a malignant narcissist, and ignorant as fuck, BUT he may actually have pulled something off in the meeting with Kim. To dismiss it without giving it a chance is crazy. Man, is the US not nation divided?, both sides deep in their self created worlds, and unwilling to give the other side one inch. Its horrifying. Maybe what we are seeing is the self destruction of the West. And the UK is just as bad. What poison did the Anglo-Saxons imbibe??

    in reply to: Debt Rattle April 30 2018 #40357

    tony smyth
    Participant

    It is NOT TRUE that the Japanese love eating Shark fin soup. No truth in that at all.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle October 2 2017 #36264

    tony smyth
    Participant

    Seeds sent to Puerto Rico. Just the remaining food ones I had in my fridge but better than nothing.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle September 15 2017 #35949

    tony smyth
    Participant

    Fintan O’Toole is by a long way the best Irish journalist around. Always love reading his work even if I dont always agree 100%.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle June 26 2017 #34745

    tony smyth
    Participant

    You know that have-a-kid proposal for Japan is a really good one. But they’d also have to subsidise the cost of creches, increase the number and keep them open until 8pm. Right now the number of creches is limited in Tokyo and has huge waiting list. They are expensive and no woman who wants to get ahead in her job wants to have to leave work early to pick up the kid. She’s never get promoted (hard enough anyhow!) Even better would be to force all large companies to have a creche in the workplace.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle April 20 2017 #33774

    tony smyth
    Participant

    You know I’m getting truely sick and tired of this UNTRUTH about EU bureaucrats telling Europeans what to do. How many of them are there?
    There were around 36,000 public sector employees in Derbyshire County Council (UK) in the third quarter of 2013, according to the Office for National Statistics. This compares to the 33,000 employed by the European Commission.

    33,000 for huge economic block, much larger than the US. So the Brits are leaving supposedly to escape the control of the EU bureaucrats. Well, how many civil servants are there in the UK? Get this: 316,792 full-time civil servants, 6,198, and part-time 9,271! Was this ever mentioned during Brexit? NO!!!

    This idea that the bureaucrats dictate how things go in Europe is nonsense. It is a LIE. The individual nations do it.

    in reply to: What is this ‘Crisis’ of Modernity? #32324

    tony smyth
    Participant

    Thank you for posting this. Its a brilliant article.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle December 9 2016 #31684

    tony smyth
    Participant

    Sure, petrol is definitely more efficient than batteries AT THE MOMENT. But as we know oil stocks are depleting alarmingly. I think Oil Tracker estimated that the position of batteries in relation to solar was some five years behind (its in Jeremy Leggett’s latest ebook). At any rate there is a lot of investment in battery storage as entrepreneurs see the need, and smell big profits. Examples?

    Promising new storage formats are in development, though none yet ready for
    commercial production.
    •Engineers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have created
    azobenzene carbon nanotubes, a new molecule that can store thermal energy
    indefinitely. The molecules convert solar energy and store it at an energy
    density comparable to lithium ion batteries. The stored energy does not
    degrade. In addition, they will be inexpensive to manufacture.
    •The University of Arkansas has developed a system of energy storage in
    which steel pipes run through parallel plates of concrete. The concrete stores
    the heat, until it is needed to boil water and produce steam. This thermocline
    system can absorb heat at an efficiency of 93.9%, and can produce electricity
    at the remarkably low cost of $0.78 per kWh.9
    •A team led by MIT Professor Donald Sadoway has developed a new battery
    whose components are all liquid. Unlike current batteries, it can last for years,
    be made with cheap easily-available materials, and can store many hours of
    energy at low cost. Sadoway’s company Ambri plans to connect a series of
    these batteries in sizes equivalent to 40 foot shipping containers, in order to
    store and deliver power to the grid, either in quick bursts or over an extended
    period. The company intends to produce batteries for paying customers by
    2016.
    •Stanford University scientists have invented a high-performance aluminium
    battery that is safe, fast charging, long-lasting and inexpensive.

    Yes none of them are in commercial production yet but its getting closer. There’s much to be despondent about: Trump and cohorts, ice melt at the poles the size of India in just this year etc, but renewables including battery power is one of the brighter spots. We are still going to have to make do with far less energy than is the case now, and get much better at energy efficiency. Our world will ultimately shrink to much more local economies. Still solar is already becoming cheaper than fossil fuels alreday, and battery innovation will follow that. Its just a question of time.

    Still, I havent read your linked article yet, but I will.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle December 9 2016 #31670

    tony smyth
    Participant

    Yep, I have to agree with Patricia re the EV car story. Sure, they are not “zero emissions”, thats a foolish claim. But as efficiency increases (and it is) and as storage of solar (and other renewable) energy gets more efficient and cheaper (and it is) EV cars will prove far more energy efficient than gasoline. Already they are less complicated to manufacture, far more energy actually gets to the wheels. This will only improve.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle October 3 2016 #30765

    tony smyth
    Participant

    Nope that’s the chart of (mostly) Iodine 131 releases a few days after the meltdowns.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle October 3 2016 #30749

    tony smyth
    Participant

    as a PS to the above. That chart of radiation in ZH article s also very misleading. It shows the amount of radioactive Iodine isotopes released in the days after the meltdowns, but those particular isotopes are very shortlived and have ceased to be any danger for FOUR years. That map/chart of no relevance to the situation now.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle October 3 2016 #30748

    tony smyth
    Participant

    That Zero Hedge article about Fukushima radiation is sensationalist bunk. At one time, years ago, 300 tons of irradiated water was being released into the Pacific. But even then it wasn’t all radioactive material. There is still some radiation going into the Pacific but not in any quantity that will irradiate the entire ocean – if you have ever flown over the Pacific its a damn big ocean.

    This below is from a recent June article from phys/org: ‘Radiation levels across the Pacific Ocean are rapidly returning to normal five years after a meltdown at the Fukushima nuclear plant spewed gases and liquids into the sea, a study showed Monday.

    Japan shut down dozens of reactors after a magnitude 9.0 earthquake-generated tsunami on March 11, 2011 triggered one of the largest ever dumps of nuclear material into the world’s oceans.

    In the days following the quake and explosions at Fukushima, seawater meant to cool the nuclear reactors instead carried radioactive elements back into the Pacific, with currents dispersing it widely.

    Five years on a review by the Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research, which brings together ocean experts from across the world, said radioactive material had been carried as far as the United States.

    But after analysing data from 20 studies of radioactivity associated with the plant, it found radiation levels in the Pacific were rapidly returning to normal after being tens of millions of times higher than usual following the disaster’.

    By no means is Fukushima out of danger, and no I will never eat Fukushima fish (I live in Tokyo, my wife is from Fukushima). But still we don’t need sensationalism. I have a book in ebook form coming out very soon so have researched this topic very thoroughly. Title: Fukushima and the coming Tokyo earthquake: and what it will mean for a fragile world economy’. Radiation does indeed pose a threat to human health, but the main reason to oppose it is its hideous expense, and the fact that the leftover radioactive core lasts so long – 232,000 years in the case PU239 from the reactor core. Very dangerous and bringing no benefit to future generations whatsoever.
    fukushimatokyoquake.com

Viewing 17 posts - 1 through 17 (of 17 total)