russellnblbs

 
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  • in reply to: Grasp Historical Initiative #140861
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    Nice summary John, although I have a quibble at the end.

    Some thing that has been bugging me from my agricultural background is the Ivermectin treatment. Ivermectin is a bloody powerful anti biotic (as in anti anything living), last resort medicine that is like dropping a nuclear bomb upon a microbial population. It is effective, but often too effective in that it kills everything, whether harmful or beneficial.

    Now obviously it has been used ‘safely’ in humans for years, but it’s long term effects on things like gut health, fertility etc are unknown and could be terrible. It will always look like it ‘works’ because it takes everything out, like a bleach bath on the inside.

    In my experience with livestock big doses of vitamin C or even just the right nutritional supplements can do what ivermectin can without the napalm effect. Proscribing something like ivermectin is to me from the same paradigm as vaccination, literally a war on (real or imagined) microbes. After the last few years, perhaps it’s time we took a more nuanced approach to medicine.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle April 17 2023 #133655
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    The whole woke/trans thing seems to have one pretty recognisable goal: sterilisation.

    What is more interesting is that looking through the history of various cultures and civilisations this seems to show up at pretty regularly at a certain point in the urban populations. China is the most notable example with the Eunuchs, but homosexuality and other practice non child producing sexual preferences seem to take off in these decadent phases in all cultures.

    The question then, relates to whether anyone is actually in control of this agenda, or it simply is an emergent property of civilisations which reach a certain urban population density and the associated lack of real world stimulations and feedback. There is that famous experiment with mice in which when given the same conditions they exhibited similar behaviour to that we are seeing in the urban west.

    As Orlov says its nothing really to worry about because it is a self-extinguishing phenomenon, and by not having children these subcultures simply die out over time. The future belongs to those who are actually born.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle February 8 2023 #128523
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    @Orboros that WEF video is so funny that it could easily by a piece of satirical comedy.

    The thing about gene editing is that it results in lousy products. That’s what both sides seem to miss, those who espouse it and those who are terrified did it. Food from GMO plants is is crap, and GMO animals are even worse (what happened to cloning?). Simple systems thinking concepts will show that meddling with extreme complexity will produce a host of outcomes that are completely unpredictable, most negative. The COVID shots are some of the worst products (in terms of design specs and safety profile) ever put to market.

    Same with AI and VR. It’s just not that fun. Try to market it all you want, but at the end of the day it’s simply solo time with a machine.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle January 14 2023 #126171
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    @AFKTT

    That seems the wrong way around to me.

    All it is scepticism at proposed human intervention in complex systems to solve an apparent problem, where the intervention might make things worse or may not be needed at all. Or the apparent problem is being used to push other things through.

    Problem – proposed solution- skepticism

    Global warming -‘green’ energy, techno utopia etc – are we sure about all this?

    COVID 19 – Gene therapy – are we sure about all this?

    If you’re merely standing in the town square shouting about the end times, good for you, but it’s not helpful to anyone else. Stand witness to your apocalypse I suppose. The rest will get on with life.

    The future belongs to those who show up.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle January 7 2023 #125368
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    This climate change debate in the comments is great, gives me a chuckle every morning.

    If I may add, the apocalyptic thinking associated with it seems to me a cultural bias. Talk of planetary meltdown or making the planet uninhabitable is nothing more than someone preaching of the rapture in the town square. No matter what perspective you are arguing and what supporting evidence you use, extrapolating this to the end and mass disaster is just the inversion of the progress focused utopian vision and reveals that one is trapped within the same Western European modes of thought. Get out of the straight line and get more into the circle, or the spiral, or anything that doesn’t go from the caves to the stars (or the End).

    Another cultural bias is the conclusion that the commonly accepted consequences of climate change (either warming or cooling) would be bad for everyone. Looking at paleo climate data there would quite clearly be winners and losers. But our all encompassing infinite bias means we have to talk for all of mankind, and the same problem/solution has to apply to the entire globe.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle December 19 2022 #123866
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    Must be careful about the whole ‘mud blood/pure blood’ thing. Despite having potentially valid medical reasons of concern regarding this, this sort of labelling and division is a very obvious example of the Western European cultural hold over of Puritanism, and we would do well to avoid falling into it. It crops up again and again throughout European (and colonies) history. It’s hubristic to go around thinking we are Gods chosen people.

    The human genome is a complete mishmash of crap from all over the place, and although I despair the thought of the damage from these horrendous jabs, we must face a future of messiness, in what we think we know we probably don’t. Nature is bloody resilient, and the human species is no different.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle December 12 2022 #123260
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    I was always under the impression that the Dutch policy regarding farmers and nitrogen had more to do with resource depletion that anything else.

    Their agriculture is probably the most energy intensive in the world, and it looks like the messaging from the powers that be is we must stop doing this to ‘save the world’, rather than we have to stop because time is up on the party. Without cheap gas nitrogen fertiliser becomes very expensive. The amount of fossil fuels that intensive Dutch animal ag uses both directly and indirectly is gargantuan compared to say, running cattle on rangeland in Argentina or Australia.

    If this comes with the added bonus of real estate speculation and greater government control well then of course the WEF Dutch government will go for it.

    in reply to: A Tale of Three Narratives, Energy Edition #119775
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    The one source of optimism regarding the overshoot line is that we don’t have to save the whole world. This worry about the entirety of humanity is a strange concept when you think about it, and is a bit of a cultural obsession of the west. It leads to the Green Revolution final solution line of thinking that the western elites seem to love.

    All we have to is adapt in the place we live, or move somewhere else. If roving war bands or some other outside issue ends us well that is just how history goes, can’t do anything about it anyway and the best we can hope for is to go down fighting.

    And a benefit of the centuries of industrial production and waste is that we will have an enormous amount of stuff lying around. The amount of steel, plastic and a smorgasbord of other products that will be available for creative reuse is an opportunity that wasn’t available to those who lived before the industrial revolution.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle October 28 2022 #119510
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    @ AFKNTT

    That sounds terrible the troubles with neighbours in NZ. Haven’t had the same experience at all here in Oz, slight craziness amongst family and friends a year or so ago but now they all change the subject embarrassingly if it is brought up. Hard to come to terms with the fact you were tricked and fell for it hook, line and sinker I suppose.

    Regarding the climate I think everyone is right. Looking at certain data and through certain paradigms you can reach a lot of different conclusions (perhaps the conclusion precedes the interpretation?), but the problem for me stems from the inherent complexity of the system, the limits of western scientific paradigms and therefore whether we can make accurate predictions. If the climate is warming, there will be winners and losers in a geographic sense, if it is staying the same ditto, if it is cooling ditto. The only way in which is really matters for most people is the best ways to adapt, which is why accurate predictions are so desired, but it’s always best to have a dollar each way.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle October 23 2022 #119113
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    @Ezlxa nothing infuriates me more than Halloween in the southern hemisphere. Not only is it a recently imported crassly consumerist joke, but the holiday itself makes no sense here. It is not autumn, it is not getting dark and scary, pumpkins are certainly not in season (and have to be imported). If it was in April/May and actually made some attempt to be connected to anything remotely culturally significant maybe it could fly, but for God’s sake it is just another embarrassing footnote in the history of an embarrassing country.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle August 30 2022 #114637
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    Is there potential for massive immigration from Europe to Russia?

    The more I think about it, the more it seems to make sense that the Indo-Europeans might return home (kurgan hypothesis). Russia doesn’t have the same Puritan streak as the rest of Europe, and has actually managed to preserve a lot of European culture, rather than tearing their history down. Plus they have oil and gas.

    The Tolstoy/Dostoyevsky dichotomy is interesting here – Tolstoy hated the west, but in hating it showed himself to be a tired westerner at heart, in the same vein as Marx. Dostoyevsky could see its satanic streak, but still managed to love it, and therefore showed himself to be truly Russian, youthful in spirit and birthing something new. This is what the west cannot understand about Russia – they still love us, despite our flaws.

    “I want to travel in Europe, Alyosha, I shall set off from here. And yet I know that I am only going to a graveyard, but it’s a most precious graveyard, that’s what it is! Precious are the dead that lie there, every stone over them speaks of such burning life in the past, of such passionate faith in their work, their truth, their struggle and their science, that I know I shall fall on the ground and kiss those stones and weep over them; though I’m convinced in my heart that it’s long been nothing but a graveyard.”

    in reply to: Debt Rattle August 10 2022 #113210
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    Urea and the other synthetic fertilisers are a roundabout way of allowing us to eat oil and gas, as laid out by Odum a fair while ago now. That’s why I’m suspect of any taxation or limiting of these fertilisers on environmental grounds, as it seems to me more likely related to the pricing of oil and gas.

    There is a mental trap we get caught in the west of our sinful ways, that is encapsulated in that ‘Man’ video. Firstly that it is universal human behaviour, which it certainly isn’t. The entire machine thinking, technical domination of nature is an outcome of Western European ways of thought (progress, extension, analysis), that we have managed to infect everyone else with (bad money drives out good). But there are also the power laws which state that destruction will inevitably follow when a system gets the enormous boost of energy that fossil fuels gave us, so to assign blame may be the wrong way of looking at it.

    But there is the further thought that on a long enough time scale, perhaps this violent eruption of the last 300 years is a great release of locked up resources for living systems to utilise. As that ridiculous Dutch news item says, trees are certainly appreciating the higher availability of carbon and other nutrients. Places like Australia, which were caught in a tectonics trap of slowly eroding fertility have been given a huge dose of phosphorus and other things it was lacking (including nutrient cycling megafauna such a buffalo and camels).

    All those big cats locked in US homes may one day become the ancestors of long lost large predators on the north American landscape. Biodiversity can recover very quickly once things settle down.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle August 9 2022 #113122
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    @Polder

    This has interested me to, a lot of the memes seem to be mentioning methane etc but it seems so far only NZ is silly enough to be attempting it on these grounds.

    Is the Dutch reasoning related to fertiliser or nitrogen runoff? Because there is probably a kernel of sensibility behind both of these reasons. The Netherlands is of course very densely populated in terms of large animals (humans included), and anytime you stuff them in that close you are going to have pollution issues. Plus Europe’s gas issues are making nitrogen fertilisers more difficult to obtain, and taxing them might be a roundabout way of rationing.

    Obviously the Dutch gov is just using this as a stalking horse to undertake a land grab, but in such a small and overpopulated place these land grabs have always been common. It is also true that a lot of the west’s agriculture has a huge level of dependence on cheap fossil fuels (along with everything else), which is being brought into sharper focus.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle October 17 2021 #90199
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    Trivium, when I read your rants, I am reminded of this quote by Orwell when describing the well known fluffer James Burnham;

    ‘It will be seen that at each point Burnham is predicting a continuation of the thing that is happening. Now the tendency to do this is not simply a bad habit, like inaccuracy or exaggeration, which one can correct by taking thought. It is a major mental disease, and its roots lie partly in cowardice and partly in the worship or power, which is not fully separable from cowardice.’

    Your dietary advice delivered on high from Lord Rothschild, he of the bluest of blood, is a convoluted way to explain the most basic crap ever that anyone with half a brain already knows. Want to be healthy? Grow your own food or catch it in the wild. Cool. But people don’t necessarily want to be healthy. And who cares? Live and let live.

    As for their master plan, yippee. They have spouting this for centuries. Oh look at the dirty unclean masses destroying poor Mother Earth, lets get rid of them with our enormous power. But they aren’t that powerful. Centuries from now no one will remember them, just like no one really remembers the Scipios or Cato’s of Rome. Everyone who reads this site is aware on some level that we are entering a long period of decline that will test everyone, just like the decline of the Roman Empire did. Some of us won’t make it very far. But that is the sweep of history, and your brand of reverse power worship is boring.

    You could get a much more nuanced and interesting view of Rothschilds agricultural advice by reading Rudolph Steiner, and a much more insightful view of the course of history by reading Oswald Spengler. People born into wealth miss out on a lot that is vital in life, and therefore the correct response is to laugh at mock them, rather than bow down in worship. The may kill you in response, but better to die on your feet than live on your knees.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle September 27 2021 #88259
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    @Polder I think Mareks disease is unlikely because the vaccines barely work, there are vast numbers of unvaccinated people globally, and there are animal reservoirs. If the vaccines actually did what they were supposed to there might be a chance but they are so leaky and crap that the disease barely has to try to evade them.

    Re Assange, well how is this at all news or surprising? Of course they want him dead. They want anyone like him dead, they can’t kill now though because it would just look silly and create a martyr. Better to just lock him up forever and hope everyone forgets about him. Surely it’s obvious to everyone by now the UK and Aus are nothing but imperial vassels with no foreign policy of their own? We get to pretend we exist s countries but we don’t really.

    Funnily enough New South Wales just announced that the same restrictions will apply to vaccinated and unvaccinated from December 1st (no passports from then), which came completely out of the blue and has shocked all of us who have experiencing the constantly tightening noose from all the aus states. Who knows if they will keep their promise but perhaps change is afoot. Makes all the other states look eminently tyrannical unless they follow suit. It may just be a political powerplay to make the Labor premiers look like cruel dictators, but if they keep the promise and the other states go gung ho with apartheid, we could see a fair bit of internal migration.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle September 21 2021 #87691
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    Things getting spicey down here in Victoria aus. Working class revolt on the cards. Despite the horror of the times, the racial make up of the protesters warms the heart. The media tries to portal them as right wing neo nazis but it is obviously a mutl racial ,multicultural mix that is united by class. Australia’s undercurrent of racism is being eclipsed by solidarity among those resisting.

    in reply to: The Vaccines Kill Many More People Than They Save #87678
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    Can anyone provide a link to that FOI request regarding the spike proteins accumulating in the ovaries? Any fertility stuff seems to be great for getting the fairer sex’s attention re the dangers.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle September 18 2021 #87511
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    @ezlxa the oz defence announcement is just hilarious. To think we are at all an independent country. Our flag says it all.

    in reply to: I Am Afraid #87432
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    Yes it is undoubtedly a worrisome time. I have found solace in trying to look at the big big picture, in that what our civilisation held so dear, our technological prowess over nature, our myth of progress, was so utterly baseless and ignorant that it’s end is going to go down this way. It has been a shock to see how quickly any ethics have been thrown aside, and it’s almost like the old tales where a hubristic society forgets all its old tales of monsters and evil, and then is whacked upside the head when they come knocking. At this point my feelings are almost good riddance. Those who inherent the earth will be those outside the modern world and its stupidity, and it is nice to see animals enjoying the lack of human encroachment during these last two years. Historians will shake their heads.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle September 15 2021 #87253
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    @ oxy understand if you don’t want to reveal but which region of Vic are you in? I too live in the rural parts and I have to say my experience has been very different. There is barely any compliance with the restrictions and looking the other way is the usual reaction. I have rarely worn a mask the last two years and although I get a few bad looks no business has ever said anything to me. The local cops are as sick of it as anyone else and always wear their masks on their chin. I have heard that other parts are far harsher. When people on this site and others comment on how crazy aus is I understand but it certainly hasn’t been my lived experience. If you turn the telly off you wouldn’t know much has changed.

    in reply to: Pandemic Brooding #87086
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    I have met David and been to his place in Hepburn, as we live in the same state and he offers guided tours. I have been checking his website weekly over the past year hoping with all hope that he hadn’t fallen into the new cult. Although I would have been shocked if he had, I have to say it was such a relief and inspiring presence to know that he is standing with us and isn’t afraid, as a public intellectual, to be transparent with his dissident view.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle September 12 2021 #87027
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    Re trying to convince others.

    It’s borderline impossible and a waste of energy. I know that there are ways to softly poke people into a different direction, but they will only change their mind if they reach the conclusion themselves. As others have noted maybe pointing out contradictions is a start.

    In the long run there really is no need to show stats and data because what we are dealing with is religion. It’s like showing a hardcore evangelist dinosaur fossils. You’re talking to a brick wall.

    Therefore combat religion with religion. We actually don’t need any data to support our position. All I have been saying is something along the lines of I have a strong disagreement with any sort of technological intervention in nature at a cellular level and therefore will always be against fiddling with it like these shots do and just leave it at that. They can’t argue with it because it is a similarly religious belief to their trust in technology. Anyone else can come up with their own spin on it but it is religion, ethics and metaphysics that is the way out of this, because a misplaced faith and the ending of an established religion (progress, tech, ascension) is what is causing the problem.

    Modern science is a tool with limits and not a source of truth, and suffers from being way too reductionist and is built off a inherent fallacy that the observed and observer are separate. Hilariously, science itself found this out the hard way when it got to the quantum level.

    Now I don’t think this means we have to turn back to the established churches, but there is no doubt room for something new built around a sacred trust in the natural world, which would put any adherent at odds with the vaccines, the lockdowns and all of it.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle September 6 2021 #86450
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    On the whole the jabs have not been tested for carcinogenic risk, mutagenic risk or impairment of fertility: this is standard for vaccines. How could they possibly test for this? It would take decades of follow up studies which have never been done.

    Look at any vaccine package insert and it will have, way down the bottom under ‘Non-clinical toxicology’:

    ‘INFANRIX (example) has not been evaluated for carcinogenic or mutagenic potential or for impairment of fertility.’

    If parents actually bothered to read this when they jabbed their kids everyone would already be aware of this. They are available online, I encourage everyone to take a look at all the inserts for all the childhood shots. No wonder big pharma is having a fit over our rejection of these shots. You didn’t care for fifty years what we jabbed into your kids why do you care now? Because it’s YOU that’s in the gun?

    in reply to: Debt Rattle September 2 2021 #86128
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    @ctbarnum, it’s not the abusive step father. He will let you leave if you want, in fact he will kick you out. It’s the devouring mother that is the more apt comparison. Does everything for you, never lets you make your own decisions, never lets you fail, feeds you, clothes you, and finally consumes you,

    in reply to: How to Win at Covid 19 Chess #85907
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    You could look at it another way. It could be the technosphere panicking at its impending energy retraction, and therefore jettisoning people off the back of the boat. If you want to keep sailing on the HMS Middle Class Consumer, the demands will become more and more taxing. If you jumped off a while ago and swam to an island or have a life boat ready, it’s not so bad. The ship is going to either sink, run aground or sail off over the age of the world at some point, so staying aboard at this stage is only prolonging the inevitable.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle August 23 2021 #85120
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    @ezlxa no mention of neighbouring Palestine either, with a much lower Vaxx rate and a much lower Covid rate. What’s hilarious is their own policies don’t match the spin. Double jabbed people have to go into 14 day isolation if they have been in close contact with a case, and it is these people who are really starting to question the narrative, and get angry about it. It’s all just marketing really, with the unfortunate add on that the product they are selling is very dangerous.

    It seems to me that One Nation or Katter/PUP could really fly in off the top ropes at the end of the year and place themselves in a 2016 Trump position. A reactionary wave is brewing and it will be interesting to see where it takes us.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle August 22 2021 #85004
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    @phoenix it could be a depopulation agenda, although if the pharmaceutical industry is behaving as it always has it may just be them covering the own arse. Wiping out the control group is their favourite tactic with vaccines and has been since day 1. A big control group is their worst nightmare, as it will expose not just this vaccine but perhaps a lot of them, especially the newer ones that have come in the last 20 years as the schedule has gone to the moon.

    @oxy yep our country has always been this way though, we just were allowed to ride along with the resource raping until now it seems. Just ask the the tribal people who got a nuke detonated on their land how well the Australian government treats people. I’ve been hearing about a trucking strike too. They could really shake things up if they wanted to. It’s funny how the media is trying to portray the resistance as white supremacy or right wing when it is very obviously a multi racial, multi ethnic congregation based on class more than anything else. I think this is true in most places.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle August 18 2021 #84499
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    The mob violence angle is interesting. Historically in pogroms etc, it was against a marginalised urban population, such as the jews or the Chinese, which is the playground analogy. It is very rarely against rural settled populations, violence against them is almost always done by militaries and government; invading armies, roving bands, secret police etc.

    Taking that from history one may draw out some thoughts. The mob violence will be more likely in the reactionary phase, as others have pointed out. It is in fact the settled rural population that is more likely to rise up violently, as they are usually more willing to use violence and have more experience with it, and have less to lose than the urban populations from opposing the government. This is what people are getting wrong about the nazis I think. Nazism was the reaction against the bullshit we are seeing now. It arose in rural southern Germany in opposition to the northern urban parts of the country. We must be just as careful with the coming reaction as to the current atrocity.

    in reply to: Hope #84128
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    Re Hope. In the most hopeless of places (Aus) it seems some of the state gov’s has pushed it too far. The new harsher urban lockdowns, in particular banning children from playing in playgrounds, is turning even some of their more loyal supporters against them. I always thought that the harsher the measures got the more they would lose support. Living things don’t respond like machines, but of course they wouldn’t know that, see: ‘The measures are fine, it’s the people that are the problem.’

    in reply to: Debt Rattle August 10 2021 #83252
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    I’ve started to notice something here in Aus that is strange but interesting in that it seems the differentiation is not just going on between class per se but also between towns that are quite close geographically but different landscapes/economies. I live in between two large regional centres, one double the size of the other, and have noticed very different reactions between the inhabitants of both.

    Town A:

    -Largest of the two verging on a city, settled earlier, predominantly white population with only limited recent immigrants.

    -Mostly middle class although with a large welfare class.

    -Economy based originally on resource extraction but now large enough to be based mostly of services with some manufacturing and continuing resource extraction.

    -Shocking amount of buy-in to the Covid narrative, extreme adherence to restrictions, shaming for not wearing a mask, high vaxx rate, scanning for businesses etc. Neighbours dobbing other neighbours in. Everyone I know from there besides a few from the poorer end of town is getting jabbed.

    Town B

    – Smaller and more decentralised with smaller towns dotted around it. Settled later and very multicultural with a large recent immigrant population along with a large First Nations population.

    -More like a third world country with wealth distribution; extreme wealth at the top but a very large working class and welfare class. Also a large organised crime element and crime rate is generally quite high.

    -Economy based around agriculture and food processing.

    -Skepticism of the Covid narrative. Low Vaxx rate, relaxed mask wearing, even in same franchise that in town A would be strict, not much attention given to restrictions, large amounts of civil disobedience and no dobbing to authorities. Everyone I know from there is not getting jabbed or only will in the most extreme of circumstances.

    Now I’m not quite sure what this means. I know Greer mentioned that something similar was being observed in providence/east providence where he lives. Note that this is not going on class lines either as middle class people in town B are skeptical whereas middle class in town A are believers.

    Can anyone comment on seeing something similar going on in the other Anglo countries?

    in reply to: Between Two Fires #82957
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    Are we sure they were ever smart in the first place? Has anyone else read Spenglers decline of the west from way back in the early 20th century? Our hubristic belief in the power of science has always been a sort of religious hold over linked up for our yearning for infinite space and ascension tied up with the industrial revolution. Not saying that science is not an extremely powerful tool to use in encounters with the universe, but it does not find truth.

    Our way of dealing with living things has become so distorted due to our machine thinking. We didn’t even have to wait to find out that the vaccines were bad, we could tell they were going to be the first time someone said they work like a computer operating system. It’s just another of many examples of trying to make living things behave like machines, by pushing a button here and expecting a result there. Life does not play by those rules, it’s a complex system with almost unnumbered non linear possibilities that can arise.

    As a farmer I have seen this first hand. Industrial agriculture is the most destructive practice on the planet, and it’s destruction stems from a scientific machine view of the world. This has led to environmental catastrophe, human health catastrophe and will most likely finally lead to a collapse in the system itself. The whole paradigm in which the modern west views the world is intrinsically linked to the progress and machines and it may be fitting if we finally perform ritual suicide by trying to apply this paradigm to ourselves.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle August 3 2021 #82202
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    @Oxy yeah my in-laws said the same to me. I replied with ‘yeah they have, and the reason they have never been approved is that they have never passed the safety trials due to the unfortunate fact that the test animals all died’. Cue silence.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle August 2 2021 #82030
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    @ezlxa I’d like to see the Oz federal government try. The constitution prevents them from mandating any medical treatment under section 51 (xxiiiA) which has been backed up by case in law in Wong v Commonwealth. Justice Kirby himself said that the supply of medical treatments cannot be forced on patients without their consent. Therefore I would say that any passport system will have to be enforced voluntarily by businesses, and we have already seen in the UK how well that will go.

    Plus by October you would think the evidence would be so overwhelming that trying to pretend that the shots help in any way will look silly. In it could be argued again and again that a negative test or proof of past infection is just as good as a vaccine passport. I think that they threat of passports is just being used to try and coerce people into getting them, as we have seen in the US and UK. It’s all advertising really, and until things actually change on the ground I’m tuning out. If all else fails the Moscow option can be used anyway, as if desperate businesses will be checking any passport set up stringently.

    in reply to: The Vaccines Don’t Work #81876
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    It’s really important to ram this home now with the general public. People seem to be OK with taking a risk with their own health as they can rationalise that it won’t affect them, they seem to be more pissed off by being sold a faulty and dysfunctional product. I’ve seen this first hand in agriculture when discussing round-up with conventional farmers (I’m biodynamic). Not hammering that their products are very bad for you, rather that they are very expensive and don’t work as advertised. Herbicides created super weeds and now there are a plethora of plants that are resistant to them. Plus the patented seed and accompanying chemical suite is becoming more and more expensive every year. It also shifts the narrative from being scared of a big bad corporation to laughing at the hubris and mistakes of said corporation.

    From talking with those who have had the jab over the last week it is resonating far more thay they don’t work than when I would bring up that they are untested and dangerous.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle August 1 2021 #81726
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    I can’t fathom how they will be able enforce mandates when it is blazingly obvious to everyone, and even told right at the start by the companies that made them, that the vaccines do not, can not, were never designed to, stop covid spreading. It is the most singularly illogical thing I’ve ever seen and the sheer blind insanity of it boggles the mind. There is absolutely no safety benefit to any workplace of having their employees jabbed, and in healthcare it is actually more dangerous to lessen the symptoms (which it doesn’t even do) of your employees because then they will be more likely to spread the disease to patients. From chats with other people even those who have got jabbed are asking questions about any sort of workplace mandate, as everyone is by now aware that the jab doesn’t stop it spreading. If they go through with us it really is reaching late soviet levels of eye rolling at the government and perhaps a sign that their downfall is close.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle July 28 2021 #81290
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    Canberra has been run from Washington since Ww2 so it’s nothing new. Before it was run from London. Australia has never really been a sovereign country just an outpost of empire that provides raw materials to the rest of the world. The one prime minister who tried to stand up to them was soft couped in the 70s which in any Latin American country would have resulted in civil war but here everyone just shrugged as Australians are want to do. Washington will abandon Canberra soon enough as it retracts the tendrils of empire, and aus will have a decision to make. But in many ways it has already made it. China doesn’t have to invade Australia because Australia will sell them anything they want for bargain basement prices anyway. We will sell land, ports, resources hell we will even let you detonate a nuclear weapon on our land for free if you want.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle July 27 2021 #81182
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    Yeah agree orboros it all comes back to the retraction of growth and the psychological shock that is causing those who were true believers in the religion. Buying into the whole narrative, wearing the mask, getting the shot is just another way for the salaried class to virtue signal their membership and to look down on us dirty deplorables same old story blah blah. Everyone I know who rejects the covid narrative outright is either self employed or low down the pay grade, or so rich that they don’t work. The firmest believers are those high up large institutions like healthcare or education. Makes sense. Of course they aren’t thinking straight because their income depends on not doing so.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle July 27 2021 #81173
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    @ orboros good points but I think the comp is off. Revolutions happen in periods of growth which is certainly not what we are in. A better comp for us is the decline of the Roman Empire or the Soviet Union. Basically the elite get more and more removed from reality that they end up in an delusional enclave while everyone else moves on and gets down to the work of surviving or they join up with barbarians or get killed in sporadic outbursts of violence. The salaried class of today are the delusional elite and as you say they are easily bought off but there is less and less of them every day. As the system jettisons them they get more and more hysterical and will bend over backwards to maintain membership in the group (see covid shots). Look at india to get a better grasp of the actual global outlook. An ancient country and culture just looked at covid and shrugged it off its gigantic shoulders. Same with a lot of Asian countries because they are big and poor they don’t care as much. I remember being blown away in Vietnam by the level of self sufficiency and ingenuity of the average person and was embarrassed at how hopeless we are in the west.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle July 27 2021 #81169
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    Madamski and upstate yeah van den bossche. I dunno I understand his argument but I think it’s risky to push it too hard in case it backfires and it all fizzles out, they change the test and covid miraculously disappears and the ‘Vaccines saved the day’ narrative is pumped endlessly opening the door for more and more experimental shots for different maladies.

    in reply to: Debt Rattle July 27 2021 #81160
    russellnblbs
    Participant

    Are we falling into the same trap as the true believers by buying into the mass die off thing? I think it should always be kept in mind that in our collective mythical western psych very often we think of the future as either utopia or apocalypse. I’m starting to worry the VDB might be a mole. If there are people out there yelling everyone is going to die, and then it doesn’t happen, it will discredit more than just the die off narrative. I just think that the unpredictable nature of fiddling with complex systems means that even if the shots were meant to do large scale damage they will behave in unexpected ways, just as if they were meant to be beneficial.

    Is it just a case of collective insanity? Another feature of our myth is that we ride to the rescue of our issues with a new technological invention. Orlov made a funny point about how when the US went into space they spent a heap of money inventing pens that could operate in zero gravity, while the Russians just took pencils. The narrative about renewable energy tech is of the same bent. I dunno. No doubt there could be a plan afoot but what would a history looking back 500 years in the future say of this time?

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